Monthly Archives: March 2011

COM M L DIDI :by P H VAISHNAV(late)

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March 22, 2008

A requiem for Madan Lal Didi
P.H. Vaishnav, IAS, Fmr. Principal Secy. Punjab Govt.

Comrade Didi is no longer in our midst.To describe him as a trade union leader or as a Communist leader does not adequately convey the measure of his stature. He was rather shy of publicity. His life however is worth a recall for he belonged to a different breed of leaders of which today we are so short.

Philosophy converged in practice although they differed on the question of the use of violence. But there were numerous similarities. It is those similarities that shaped the attitudes of the leaders born in that era no matter what party they belonged to.

An outstanding characteristic of leaders of those days was that they joined a movement or an organization to contribute and not to make attaining power. Selfless It was the general upsurge against the British imperial rule that threw up a splendid leadership all over the country. The revolutionary tradition and the Gandhian devotion to a cause was their sole objective and therefore gains for themselves either by using their positions for making money or for they treated work as its own reward.

From that followed several virtues, which alas we miss in our leaders today. A simple lifestyle bordering on austerity came to them naturally and expensive life styles and luxuries of life held no appeal for them. They were therefore able to make do with very few things and could never be corrupted by allurement. It never crossed their minds that if they had taken to a profession, they would have been above wants, provided for their children and secured adequate income for their old age. The thought for the morrow never worried them. Nor did they allow themselves to be afflicted with an urge for amassing property. This again bred a rare courage and integrity among them besides giving absolute focus on the tasks they were engaged in. Another side of the same coin was that they did not use their offices for the advancement of the careers of their children. In these days of hereditary democracy the only exception to the rule are the leaders of the left who do not try to push their children into influential positions. In fact the children of whole timers suffered neglect. That was the extent of their commitment to their ideals.

There was another side to their functioning that only those who have come in contact with them would know. It was the labour they put in to study a problem and their efforts to do a task in the best possible manner. They were given to reading and writing and reflecting-virtues, which again cannot be presumed in the present day politicians.

When I was in the Punjab Government service, I had occasion to deal with the question of regularizing the services of work charged employees whose services were terminable with the completion of the work for which they were hired. They thus faced an uncertain future and enjoyed no benefits associated with permanent employment.

Madan Lal Didi was leading the movement for making the work charged labour permanent. It was in that connection that during the negotiations with government which I was conducting as Chief Secretary I have had occasion to interact with him. He was a man of few words but he spoke with full knowledge of his subject and intervened during discussions when strictly necessary. This gave strength to his words that comes from a mastery of facts and rules. If the work charged personnel earned a policy commitment from government on making them permanent — the credit goes to Madan Lal Didi.

Today when our public life has ceased to be value based and good people have deserted the political process in favour of the security and prestige of government service or the rewards of professional careers, thereby making way for drop outs and adventurers in politics, people like Didi stand out as men of a different breed. They are to our great ill luck men and women of a vanishing tribe. His wife, Sheila Didi, a barrister from Lincoln’s Inn and a junior of the famous British lawyer D.N Pritt, worked shoulder to shoulder with her husband for the cause of the trade union movement. My heart goes out to her. People like Sheilaji or the Dang couple are alas a vanishing tribe but all political parties meaning well by our country will have to face the question of finding recruits with idealism, integrity, commitment and ability into their fold.

With these words I join the many who mourn this great loss.

P.H. Vaishnav, IAS
Chandigarh, India

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Indicorps 2011 Fellowship with Preet Lari Trust

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Preet lari Trust and Indicorps are offerring a fellowship .Kindly see the details in the form which has to be submitted by march 27.

— On Tue, 3/22/11, Dev Tayde <dtayde@gmail.com> wrote:

From: Dev Tayde <dtayde@gmail.com>
Subject: Indicorps 2011 Fellowship with Preet Lari Trust
To: “Punam Singh” <preetlarhi@yahoo.com>
Date: Tuesday, March 22, 2011, 12:49 PM

Dear Punamji,

Hope Ammiji, Rathikantji and you are doing well.

We are sure you are excited at the prospect of having at least one Indicorps 2011 Fellow to further add strength to your inspiring team. The steady stream of applicants we have is an indicator of a good start to the Indicorps 2011 Fellowship. The better aligned we are, the better placed we will be to invest in our Fellows to make sure they meet the goals you have charted out for them in the project description. The deadline for Indicorps 2011 Fellowship application is March 27, 2011 and we urge you to recommend the Indicorps 2011 Fellowship to eligible individuals that you may know.

Attached to this mail are

  • Indicorps 2011 Fellowship calendar
  • Final project description for Preet Lari Trust

Please make sure you carefully read comments to some cells in the Events column of the calendar. We recommend you save this calendar as it will come into play throughout the Indicorps Fellow’s time with your esteemed organization and will assist your planning and coordination.

My teammate Jaidip Patel will soon get in touch with you about the Indicorps 2011 Partner Organization Workshop in June 2011. Please note each partner organization can be represented by one team member. Ideally the person should be one who will mentor the Indicorps Fellow(s) throughout the Fellowship with Preet Lari Trust. Indicorps will reimburse train fare for the second class sleeper segment and/or bus fare in line with our simple living philosophy. Attendance for the two partner organization workshops that we will facilitate in June and September respectively is mandatory. The two workshops aim to build a collective understanding of the Indicorps Fellowship, the Indian development sector and are a stepping stone in ensuring that Fellows achieve goals listed in the project description.

I will follow up with a mail about the Indicorps selection process. Please feel free to reach out if you have any further queries. We are excited about the Indicorps 2011 Fellowship and look forward to strengthening our association with Preet Lari Trust.

With love in service,

Dev

Women Action For Ecology WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF…

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— On Sun, 3/20/11, Amanjot Kaur <fbmessage+ogirrcgf@facebookmail.com> wrote:

Subject: [Women Action For Ecology] WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF…

Amanjot Kaur posted in Women Action For Ecology.

WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ! Did you know that when they brought in chemical pesticides, they said that they will kill only the pests and that we had nothing else to worry about? Today, we know that this was simply untrue. Pesticides leave behind numerous negative impacts on human beings and other living organisms. These pesticides are usually classified for their acute toxicity or for their immediate poisonous effects. However, pesticides have many lasting impacts even if you are exposed to them in very small doses. These are called chronic impacts of pesticides. These chronic impacts could be part of direct as well as indirect exposure. Direct exposure could be through ingestion (consuming a pesticide directly) or through the skin or through inhalation of air laden with pesticide fumes. Indirect exposure could be through residues, in food and water, for instance. Women get exposed either by helping men in mixing and spraying of pesticides or working in pesticides-sprayed fields. Women also come into contact with pesticides by washing clothes of men who had sprayed pesticides or in trying to clean empty pesticide containers etc. Studies have shown a link between a variety of reproductive health impacts in women and pesticide exposure. Studies have documented increased incidence of miscarriages, stillbirths and delayed pregnancy among women agricultural workers and wives of men employed in pesticide mixing and spraying. Specific herbicides also disrupt estrogen cycles in women. There is also evidence of increased risk of birth defects from parental exposure to pesticides, although the extent of this risk is uncertain. Carbonate and organophosphate insecticides have been reported to increase birth prematurely and spontaneous abortion rates. Studies show that the time to menopause increases with exposure to pesticides, that too hormonally active chemicals. Other recorded health effects from research with women in the field include acute effects such as dizziness, muscular pain, sneezing, itching, skin burns, blisters, difficulty breathing, nausea, nail changing color and sore eyes. Women with potential exposure to pesticides at work or at home took longer to get pregnant than women without pesticide connections. Women who reported occupational exposure to currently-used pesticides were 30 percent less likely to conceive than women without occupational exposure. Women who used pesticides experienced longer menstrual cycles and increased incidence of missed periods. All the above show that a woman’s basic right to conceive when she wants to and her right to give birth to a healthy baby are violated by the toxicity of chemical pesticides. The social implication could be that the woman is stigmatized as someone unable to conceive. The vulnerability of women, like in the case of children, to toxic effects of pesticides is higher because of two-three reasons: several toxic pesticides settle in the body’s fatty tissues and persist there. Women have more fatty tissue and are therefore, more vulnerable. Exposure of women in the first instance is higher also because their skin is softer and the chemical gets absorbed through this medium. Women (like children) also have less efficient excretory systems compared to men. At a social level, women’s vulnerability to the dangerous effects of pesticides also gets enhanced due to illiteracy and lack of knowledge about the toxic effects of pesticides. What can YOU do? You can avoid and minimize exposure to pesticides both in direct and indirect ways. For one thing, if your family is into farming, try and get your agricultural farm converted into an organic farm. There are scores of ecological farming practices that you can adopt and promote with your neighbors too, to slowly get rid of chemicals in our farms, soils, food and water. A simple and easy thing to start straightaway is to grow at least the vegetables that the family consumes in a kitchen garden at home. As a consumer, you can try to access organic food products and in the process, also support those farmers who are making an attempt to shift to ecological farming. WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ! Did you know that when they brought in chemical pesticides, they said that they will kill only the pests and that we had nothing else to worry about? Today, we know that this was simply untrue. Pesticides leave behind numerous negative impacts on human beings and other living organisms. These pesticides are usually classified for their acute toxicity or for their immediate poisonous effects. However, pesticides have many lasting impacts even if you are exposed to them in very small doses. These are called chronic impacts of pesticides. These chronic impacts could be part of direct as well as indirect exposure. Direct exposure could be through ingestion (consuming a pesticide directly) or through the skin or through inhalation of air laden with pesticide fumes. Indirect exposure could be through residues, in food and water, for instance. Women get exposed either by helping men in mixing and spraying of pesticides or working in pesticides-sprayed fields. Women also come into contact with pesticides by washing clothes of men who had sprayed pesticides or in trying to clean empty pesticide containers etc. Studies have shown a link between a variety of reproductive health impacts in women and pesticide exposure. Studies have documented increased incidence of miscarriages, stillbirths and delayed pregnancy among women agricultural workers and wives of men employed in pesticide mixing and spraying. Specific herbicides also disrupt estrogen cycles in women. There is also evidence of increased risk of birth defects from parental exposure to pesticides, although the extent of this risk is uncertain. Carbonate and organophosphate insecticides have been reported to increase birth prematurely and spontaneous abortion rates. Studies show that the time to menopause increases with exposure to pesticides, that too hormonally active chemicals. Other recorded health effects from research with women in the field include acute effects such as dizziness, muscular pain, sneezing, itching, skin burns, blisters, difficulty breathing, nausea, nail changing color and sore eyes. Women with potential exposure to pesticides at work or at home took longer to get pregnant than women without pesticide connections. Women who reported occupational exposure to currently-used pesticides were 30 percent less likely to conceive than women without occupational exposure. Women who used pesticides experienced longer menstrual cycles and increased incidence of missed periods. All the above show that a woman’s basic right to conceive when she wants to and her right to give birth to a healthy baby are violated by the toxicity of chemical pesticides. The social implication could be that the woman is stigmatized as someone unable to conceive. The vulnerability of women, like in the case of children, to toxic effects of pesticides is higher because of two-three reasons: several toxic pesticides settle in the body’s fatty tissues and persist there. Women have more fatty tissue and are therefore, more vulnerable. Exposure of women in the first instance is higher also because their skin is softer and the chemical gets absorbed through this medium. Women (like children) also have less efficient excretory systems compared to men. At a social level, women’s vulnerability to the dangerous effects of pesticides also gets enhanced due to illiteracy and lack of knowledge about the toxic effects of pesticides. What can YOU do? You can avoid and minimize exposure to pesticides both in direct and indirect ways. For one thing, if your family is into farming, try and get your agricultural farm converted into an organic farm. There are scores of ecological farming practices that you can adopt and promote with your neighbors too, to slowly get rid of chemicals in our farms, soils, food and water. A simple and easy thing to start straightaway is to grow at least the vegetables that the family consumes in a kitchen garden at home. As a consumer, you can try to access organic food products and in the process, also support those farmers who are making an attempt to shift to ecological farming.
Amanjot Kaur 2:08pm Mar 20

WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES !

Did you know that when they brought in chemical pesticides, they said that they will kill only the pests and that we had nothing else to worry about? Today, we know that this was simply untrue. Pesticides leave behind numerous negative impacts on human beings and other living organisms.

These pesticides are usually classified for their acute toxicity or for their immediate poisonous effects. However, pesticides have many lasting impacts even if you are exposed to them in very small doses. These are called chronic impacts of pesticides. These chronic impacts could be part of direct as well as indirect exposure. Direct exposure could be through ingestion (consuming a pesticide directly) or through the skin or through inhalation of air laden with pesticide fumes. Indirect exposure could be through residues, in food and water, for instance. Women get exposed either by helping men in mixing and spraying of pesticides or working in pesticides-sprayed fields. Women also come into contact with pesticides by washing clothes of men who had sprayed pesticides or in trying to clean empty pesticide containers etc.

Studies have shown a link between a variety of reproductive health impacts in women and pesticide exposure. Studies have documented increased incidence of miscarriages, stillbirths and delayed pregnancy among women agricultural workers and wives of men employed in pesticide mixing and spraying. Specific herbicides also disrupt estrogen cycles in women. There is also evidence of increased risk of birth defects from parental exposure to pesticides, although the extent of this risk is uncertain. Carbonate and organophosphate insecticides have been reported to increase birth prematurely and spontaneous abortion rates. Studies show that the time to menopause increases with exposure to pesticides, that too hormonally active chemicals. Other recorded health effects from research with women in the field include acute effects such as dizziness, muscular pain, sneezing, itching, skin burns, blisters, difficulty breathing, nausea, nail changing color and sore eyes.

Women with potential exposure to pesticides at work or at home took longer to get pregnant than women without pesticide connections. Women who reported occupational exposure to currently-used pesticides were 30 percent less likely to conceive than women without occupational exposure. Women who used pesticides experienced longer menstrual cycles and increased incidence of missed periods.

All the above show that a woman’s basic right to conceive when she wants to and her right to give birth to a healthy baby are violated by the toxicity of chemical pesticides. The social implication could be that the woman is stigmatized as someone unable to conceive.

The vulnerability of women, like in the case of children, to toxic effects of pesticides is higher because of two-three reasons: several toxic pesticides settle in the body’s fatty tissues and persist there. Women have more fatty tissue and are therefore, more vulnerable. Exposure of women in the first instance is higher also because their skin is softer and the chemical gets absorbed through this medium. Women (like children) also have less efficient excretory systems compared to men. At a social level, women’s vulnerability to the dangerous effects of pesticides also gets enhanced due to illiteracy and lack of knowledge about the toxic effects of pesticides.

What can YOU do?

You can avoid and minimize exposure to pesticides both in direct and indirect ways.

For one thing, if your family is into farming, try and get your agricultural farm converted into an organic farm. There are scores of ecological farming practices that you can adopt and promote with your neighbors too, to slowly get rid of chemicals in our farms, soils, food and water.

A simple and easy thing to start straightaway is to grow at least the vegetables that the family consumes in a kitchen garden at home.

As a consumer, you can try to access organic food products and in the process, also support those farmers who are making an attempt to shift to ecological farming.

WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES !

Did you know that when they brought in chemical pesticides, they said that they will kill only the pests and that we had nothing else to worry about? Today, we know that this was simply untrue. Pesticides leave behind numerous negative impacts on human beings and other living organisms.

These pesticides are usually classified for their acute toxicity or for their immediate poisonous effects. However, pesticides have many lasting impacts even if you are exposed to them in very small doses. These are called chronic impacts of pesticides. These chronic impacts could be part of direct as well as indirect exposure. Direct exposure could be through ingestion (consuming a pesticide directly) or through the skin or through inhalation of air laden with pesticide fumes. Indirect exposure could be through residues, in food and water, for instance. Women get exposed either by helping men in mixing and spraying of pesticides or working in pesticides-sprayed fields. Women also come into contact with pesticides by washing clothes of men who had sprayed pesticides or in trying to clean empty pesticide containers etc.

Studies have shown a link between a variety of reproductive health impacts in women and pesticide exposure. Studies have documented increased incidence of miscarriages, stillbirths and delayed pregnancy among women agricultural workers and wives of men employed in pesticide mixing and spraying. Specific herbicides also disrupt estrogen cycles in women. There is also evidence of increased risk of birth defects from parental exposure to pesticides, although the extent of this risk is uncertain. Carbonate and organophosphate insecticides have been reported to increase birth prematurely and spontaneous abortion rates. Studies show that the time to menopause increases with exposure to pesticides, that too hormonally active chemicals. Other recorded health effects from research with women in the field include acute effects such as dizziness, muscular pain, sneezing, itching, skin burns, blisters, difficulty breathing, nausea, nail changing color and sore eyes.

Women with potential exposure to pesticides at work or at home took longer to get pregnant than women without pesticide connections. Women who reported occupational exposure to currently-used pesticides were 30 percent less likely to conceive than women without occupational exposure. Women who used pesticides experienced longer menstrual cycles and increased incidence of missed periods.

All the above show that a woman’s basic right to conceive when she wants to and her right to give birth to a healthy baby are violated by the toxicity of chemical pesticides. The social implication could be that the woman is stigmatized as someone unable to conceive.

The vulnerability of women, like in the case of children, to toxic effects of pesticides is higher because of two-three reasons: several toxic pesticides settle in the body’s fatty tissues and persist there. Women have more fatty tissue and are therefore, more vulnerable. Exposure of women in the first instance is higher also because their skin is softer and the chemical gets absorbed through this medium. Women (like children) also have less efficient excretory systems compared to men. At a social level, women’s vulnerability to the dangerous effects of pesticides also gets enhanced due to illiteracy and lack of knowledge about the toxic effects of pesticides.

What can YOU do?

You can avoid and minimize exposure to pesticides both in direct and indirect ways.

For one thing, if your family is into farming, try and get your agricultural farm converted into an organic farm. There are scores of ecological farming practices that you can adopt and promote with your neighbors too, to slowly get rid of chemicals in our farms, soils, food and water.

A simple and easy thing to start straightaway is to grow at least the vegetables that the family consumes in a kitchen garden at home.

As a consumer, you can try to access organic food products and in the process, also support those farmers who are making an attempt to shift to ecological farming.

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