Women Action For Ecology WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF…

Standard

— On Sun, 3/20/11, Amanjot Kaur <fbmessage+ogirrcgf@facebookmail.com> wrote:

Subject: [Women Action For Ecology] WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF…

Amanjot Kaur posted in Women Action For Ecology.

WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ! Did you know that when they brought in chemical pesticides, they said that they will kill only the pests and that we had nothing else to worry about? Today, we know that this was simply untrue. Pesticides leave behind numerous negative impacts on human beings and other living organisms. These pesticides are usually classified for their acute toxicity or for their immediate poisonous effects. However, pesticides have many lasting impacts even if you are exposed to them in very small doses. These are called chronic impacts of pesticides. These chronic impacts could be part of direct as well as indirect exposure. Direct exposure could be through ingestion (consuming a pesticide directly) or through the skin or through inhalation of air laden with pesticide fumes. Indirect exposure could be through residues, in food and water, for instance. Women get exposed either by helping men in mixing and spraying of pesticides or working in pesticides-sprayed fields. Women also come into contact with pesticides by washing clothes of men who had sprayed pesticides or in trying to clean empty pesticide containers etc. Studies have shown a link between a variety of reproductive health impacts in women and pesticide exposure. Studies have documented increased incidence of miscarriages, stillbirths and delayed pregnancy among women agricultural workers and wives of men employed in pesticide mixing and spraying. Specific herbicides also disrupt estrogen cycles in women. There is also evidence of increased risk of birth defects from parental exposure to pesticides, although the extent of this risk is uncertain. Carbonate and organophosphate insecticides have been reported to increase birth prematurely and spontaneous abortion rates. Studies show that the time to menopause increases with exposure to pesticides, that too hormonally active chemicals. Other recorded health effects from research with women in the field include acute effects such as dizziness, muscular pain, sneezing, itching, skin burns, blisters, difficulty breathing, nausea, nail changing color and sore eyes. Women with potential exposure to pesticides at work or at home took longer to get pregnant than women without pesticide connections. Women who reported occupational exposure to currently-used pesticides were 30 percent less likely to conceive than women without occupational exposure. Women who used pesticides experienced longer menstrual cycles and increased incidence of missed periods. All the above show that a woman’s basic right to conceive when she wants to and her right to give birth to a healthy baby are violated by the toxicity of chemical pesticides. The social implication could be that the woman is stigmatized as someone unable to conceive. The vulnerability of women, like in the case of children, to toxic effects of pesticides is higher because of two-three reasons: several toxic pesticides settle in the body’s fatty tissues and persist there. Women have more fatty tissue and are therefore, more vulnerable. Exposure of women in the first instance is higher also because their skin is softer and the chemical gets absorbed through this medium. Women (like children) also have less efficient excretory systems compared to men. At a social level, women’s vulnerability to the dangerous effects of pesticides also gets enhanced due to illiteracy and lack of knowledge about the toxic effects of pesticides. What can YOU do? You can avoid and minimize exposure to pesticides both in direct and indirect ways. For one thing, if your family is into farming, try and get your agricultural farm converted into an organic farm. There are scores of ecological farming practices that you can adopt and promote with your neighbors too, to slowly get rid of chemicals in our farms, soils, food and water. A simple and easy thing to start straightaway is to grow at least the vegetables that the family consumes in a kitchen garden at home. As a consumer, you can try to access organic food products and in the process, also support those farmers who are making an attempt to shift to ecological farming. WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES ! Did you know that when they brought in chemical pesticides, they said that they will kill only the pests and that we had nothing else to worry about? Today, we know that this was simply untrue. Pesticides leave behind numerous negative impacts on human beings and other living organisms. These pesticides are usually classified for their acute toxicity or for their immediate poisonous effects. However, pesticides have many lasting impacts even if you are exposed to them in very small doses. These are called chronic impacts of pesticides. These chronic impacts could be part of direct as well as indirect exposure. Direct exposure could be through ingestion (consuming a pesticide directly) or through the skin or through inhalation of air laden with pesticide fumes. Indirect exposure could be through residues, in food and water, for instance. Women get exposed either by helping men in mixing and spraying of pesticides or working in pesticides-sprayed fields. Women also come into contact with pesticides by washing clothes of men who had sprayed pesticides or in trying to clean empty pesticide containers etc. Studies have shown a link between a variety of reproductive health impacts in women and pesticide exposure. Studies have documented increased incidence of miscarriages, stillbirths and delayed pregnancy among women agricultural workers and wives of men employed in pesticide mixing and spraying. Specific herbicides also disrupt estrogen cycles in women. There is also evidence of increased risk of birth defects from parental exposure to pesticides, although the extent of this risk is uncertain. Carbonate and organophosphate insecticides have been reported to increase birth prematurely and spontaneous abortion rates. Studies show that the time to menopause increases with exposure to pesticides, that too hormonally active chemicals. Other recorded health effects from research with women in the field include acute effects such as dizziness, muscular pain, sneezing, itching, skin burns, blisters, difficulty breathing, nausea, nail changing color and sore eyes. Women with potential exposure to pesticides at work or at home took longer to get pregnant than women without pesticide connections. Women who reported occupational exposure to currently-used pesticides were 30 percent less likely to conceive than women without occupational exposure. Women who used pesticides experienced longer menstrual cycles and increased incidence of missed periods. All the above show that a woman’s basic right to conceive when she wants to and her right to give birth to a healthy baby are violated by the toxicity of chemical pesticides. The social implication could be that the woman is stigmatized as someone unable to conceive. The vulnerability of women, like in the case of children, to toxic effects of pesticides is higher because of two-three reasons: several toxic pesticides settle in the body’s fatty tissues and persist there. Women have more fatty tissue and are therefore, more vulnerable. Exposure of women in the first instance is higher also because their skin is softer and the chemical gets absorbed through this medium. Women (like children) also have less efficient excretory systems compared to men. At a social level, women’s vulnerability to the dangerous effects of pesticides also gets enhanced due to illiteracy and lack of knowledge about the toxic effects of pesticides. What can YOU do? You can avoid and minimize exposure to pesticides both in direct and indirect ways. For one thing, if your family is into farming, try and get your agricultural farm converted into an organic farm. There are scores of ecological farming practices that you can adopt and promote with your neighbors too, to slowly get rid of chemicals in our farms, soils, food and water. A simple and easy thing to start straightaway is to grow at least the vegetables that the family consumes in a kitchen garden at home. As a consumer, you can try to access organic food products and in the process, also support those farmers who are making an attempt to shift to ecological farming.
Amanjot Kaur 2:08pm Mar 20

WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES !

Did you know that when they brought in chemical pesticides, they said that they will kill only the pests and that we had nothing else to worry about? Today, we know that this was simply untrue. Pesticides leave behind numerous negative impacts on human beings and other living organisms.

These pesticides are usually classified for their acute toxicity or for their immediate poisonous effects. However, pesticides have many lasting impacts even if you are exposed to them in very small doses. These are called chronic impacts of pesticides. These chronic impacts could be part of direct as well as indirect exposure. Direct exposure could be through ingestion (consuming a pesticide directly) or through the skin or through inhalation of air laden with pesticide fumes. Indirect exposure could be through residues, in food and water, for instance. Women get exposed either by helping men in mixing and spraying of pesticides or working in pesticides-sprayed fields. Women also come into contact with pesticides by washing clothes of men who had sprayed pesticides or in trying to clean empty pesticide containers etc.

Studies have shown a link between a variety of reproductive health impacts in women and pesticide exposure. Studies have documented increased incidence of miscarriages, stillbirths and delayed pregnancy among women agricultural workers and wives of men employed in pesticide mixing and spraying. Specific herbicides also disrupt estrogen cycles in women. There is also evidence of increased risk of birth defects from parental exposure to pesticides, although the extent of this risk is uncertain. Carbonate and organophosphate insecticides have been reported to increase birth prematurely and spontaneous abortion rates. Studies show that the time to menopause increases with exposure to pesticides, that too hormonally active chemicals. Other recorded health effects from research with women in the field include acute effects such as dizziness, muscular pain, sneezing, itching, skin burns, blisters, difficulty breathing, nausea, nail changing color and sore eyes.

Women with potential exposure to pesticides at work or at home took longer to get pregnant than women without pesticide connections. Women who reported occupational exposure to currently-used pesticides were 30 percent less likely to conceive than women without occupational exposure. Women who used pesticides experienced longer menstrual cycles and increased incidence of missed periods.

All the above show that a woman’s basic right to conceive when she wants to and her right to give birth to a healthy baby are violated by the toxicity of chemical pesticides. The social implication could be that the woman is stigmatized as someone unable to conceive.

The vulnerability of women, like in the case of children, to toxic effects of pesticides is higher because of two-three reasons: several toxic pesticides settle in the body’s fatty tissues and persist there. Women have more fatty tissue and are therefore, more vulnerable. Exposure of women in the first instance is higher also because their skin is softer and the chemical gets absorbed through this medium. Women (like children) also have less efficient excretory systems compared to men. At a social level, women’s vulnerability to the dangerous effects of pesticides also gets enhanced due to illiteracy and lack of knowledge about the toxic effects of pesticides.

What can YOU do?

You can avoid and minimize exposure to pesticides both in direct and indirect ways.

For one thing, if your family is into farming, try and get your agricultural farm converted into an organic farm. There are scores of ecological farming practices that you can adopt and promote with your neighbors too, to slowly get rid of chemicals in our farms, soils, food and water.

A simple and easy thing to start straightaway is to grow at least the vegetables that the family consumes in a kitchen garden at home.

As a consumer, you can try to access organic food products and in the process, also support those farmers who are making an attempt to shift to ecological farming.

WOMEN MORE VULNERABLE TO TOXIC EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES !

Did you know that when they brought in chemical pesticides, they said that they will kill only the pests and that we had nothing else to worry about? Today, we know that this was simply untrue. Pesticides leave behind numerous negative impacts on human beings and other living organisms.

These pesticides are usually classified for their acute toxicity or for their immediate poisonous effects. However, pesticides have many lasting impacts even if you are exposed to them in very small doses. These are called chronic impacts of pesticides. These chronic impacts could be part of direct as well as indirect exposure. Direct exposure could be through ingestion (consuming a pesticide directly) or through the skin or through inhalation of air laden with pesticide fumes. Indirect exposure could be through residues, in food and water, for instance. Women get exposed either by helping men in mixing and spraying of pesticides or working in pesticides-sprayed fields. Women also come into contact with pesticides by washing clothes of men who had sprayed pesticides or in trying to clean empty pesticide containers etc.

Studies have shown a link between a variety of reproductive health impacts in women and pesticide exposure. Studies have documented increased incidence of miscarriages, stillbirths and delayed pregnancy among women agricultural workers and wives of men employed in pesticide mixing and spraying. Specific herbicides also disrupt estrogen cycles in women. There is also evidence of increased risk of birth defects from parental exposure to pesticides, although the extent of this risk is uncertain. Carbonate and organophosphate insecticides have been reported to increase birth prematurely and spontaneous abortion rates. Studies show that the time to menopause increases with exposure to pesticides, that too hormonally active chemicals. Other recorded health effects from research with women in the field include acute effects such as dizziness, muscular pain, sneezing, itching, skin burns, blisters, difficulty breathing, nausea, nail changing color and sore eyes.

Women with potential exposure to pesticides at work or at home took longer to get pregnant than women without pesticide connections. Women who reported occupational exposure to currently-used pesticides were 30 percent less likely to conceive than women without occupational exposure. Women who used pesticides experienced longer menstrual cycles and increased incidence of missed periods.

All the above show that a woman’s basic right to conceive when she wants to and her right to give birth to a healthy baby are violated by the toxicity of chemical pesticides. The social implication could be that the woman is stigmatized as someone unable to conceive.

The vulnerability of women, like in the case of children, to toxic effects of pesticides is higher because of two-three reasons: several toxic pesticides settle in the body’s fatty tissues and persist there. Women have more fatty tissue and are therefore, more vulnerable. Exposure of women in the first instance is higher also because their skin is softer and the chemical gets absorbed through this medium. Women (like children) also have less efficient excretory systems compared to men. At a social level, women’s vulnerability to the dangerous effects of pesticides also gets enhanced due to illiteracy and lack of knowledge about the toxic effects of pesticides.

What can YOU do?

You can avoid and minimize exposure to pesticides both in direct and indirect ways.

For one thing, if your family is into farming, try and get your agricultural farm converted into an organic farm. There are scores of ecological farming practices that you can adopt and promote with your neighbors too, to slowly get rid of chemicals in our farms, soils, food and water.

A simple and easy thing to start straightaway is to grow at least the vegetables that the family consumes in a kitchen garden at home.

As a consumer, you can try to access organic food products and in the process, also support those farmers who are making an attempt to shift to ecological farming.

View Post on Facebook · Edit Email Settings · Reply to this email to add a comment.

About preetlari

"Preetlari", Punjab's magazine established in 1933 and published from Preetnagar, Dist. Amritsar. S. Gurbaksh Singh founded the magazine and also the model village, Preetnagar. The magazine is running in its 78th year and since last year is being taken by nearly 20000 primary and upper primary schools of Punjab ,too.

One response »

  1. Pingback: Haz-Map updated to include more information about occupational exposures to hazardous substances « Health and Medical News and Resources

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s