Bangar, the meaning of the word

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A sadhu said he wasgoing to Bangar. When asked where Bangar was, he said in a strange tone and a smile:everywhere.

Searched on google, Bangar is the word for highland, that used once to be the place where a river etc deposited soil. The land got raised and was ancient fertile land, perhaps the word also means jungle or dense growth area due to that, and the new fertile soil deposit land nearby is called Khadir or Khadar.

There is a city by the name of Bangar but it is in Phillipines, and it says on its site that the word comes from many trees that grew there..

maybe the word was loosely used for THE WILD.

Bengal, Bangaluru, Banga..and the surname Bangar in Punjab.___________________

1. .Bangar, La Union . Bangar is a 3rd class municipality in the province of La Union, Philippines. According to the latest census, it has a population of 36,189 people in 6,936 households. It is composed of an area approximately 3,729.17 of land lies on the northern tip of La Union. It is bounded by the China Sea on the western side, Tagudin Ilocos Sur on the north, Sudipen on the east and Balaoan and Luna on the southwestern side. The fabled Amburayan River flows alo… More
Bangar is a 3rd class municipality in the province of La Union, Philippines. According to the latest census, it has a population of 36,189 people in 6,936 households. It is composed of an area approximately 3,729.17 of land lies on the northern tip of La Union. It is bounded by the China Sea on the western side, Tagudin Ilocos Sur on the north, Sudipen on the east and Balaoan and Luna on the southwestern side. The fabled Amburayan River flows along the border separating Bangar from Tagudin, Ilocos Sur. The town Bangar (pronounced: Bang-gar) got its name from the bangar (pronounced: ba- ngar) tree which was growing abundantly in the place where the town now stands. The bangar tree which is more known because of the foul odor that emanates from its fruits. Sub-Political Units 1700 marked the official foundation of Bangar under the patronage of Saint Christopher when it became a ministry. However, Christianity was brought as early as in the later part of 1500 when Bangar was still a…
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Khadir and Bangar
From Wikipedia(View original Wikipedia Article) Last modified on 11 January 2011 at 03:07
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

In any doab, khadir land (green) lies next to a river, while bangar land (olive) has greater elevation and lies further from the riverKhādir and Bāngar (Hindi-Urdu: खादर और बांगर, کهادر اور بانگر) are terms used in Hindi-Urdu, Punjabi and Sindhi in the Indo-Gangetic plains of North India and Pakistan to differentiate between two types of river plains and alluvial soils. Khadir or Khadar plains are those that are low-lying next to a river. Khadir areas are prone to flooding and sometimes include portions of former river-beds that became available for agriculture when a river changed course.[1] Khadir soil consists of new alluvial deposits and is often very fertile. Bangar plains are more upland, and consist of older alluvial soil. Bangar areas are less prone to flooding but are usually more sandy and less fertile as well.[2][3]

Since North India and Pakistan are coursed by a multiplicity of Himalayan rivers that divide the plains into doabs (i.e. regions between two rivers), the Indo-Gangetic plains consist of alternating regions of river, khadir and bangar. The centers of the doabs consist of bangar and the peripheries, which line the rivers, consist of khadir.[4] Historically, villages in the doabs have been officially classified as khadir, khadir-bangar (i.e. mixed) or bangar for many centuries and different agricultural tax rates applied based on a tiered land-productivity scale.[5][6] In some areas, these terms have become incorporated in several village names themselves, such as Murshidpur Bangar and Ranchi Bangar-Khadir in Mathura district of Uttar Pradesh.[7]

References
^ Yash Pal Singh, भूगोल (Geography), VK Publications, ISBN 9788189611217, http://books.google.com/books?id=dzSfcInDKD8C, “… मैदान के उस भाग को बांगर कहते हैं जहाँ नदियों की बाढ़ का पानी नहीं पहुंच पाता … पुरानी जलोढ़ मिट्टी … खादर: यह वह क्षेत्र है जहाँ नदियों की बाढ़ का जल प्रतिवर्ष आ जाता है …”
^ Alexander Macaulay Markham, Report on the Tenth Revision of Settlement, http://books.google.com/books?id=rpsIAAAAQAAJ, “… The open plain country of Bijnour is, in common parlance, divided into two portions – ‘Khadir’ or low-lying land and ‘Bangar’ or upland …”
^ Shahnaz Parveen, Changing face and challenges of urbanization: a case study of Uttar Pradesh, Concept Publishing Company, 2005, ISBN 9788180692376, http://books.google.com/books?id=q_siAxtwoawC, “… Lithologically and structurally, the Ganga-Yamuna Plain is divided into ‘Bangar’ and ‘Khadar’. ‘Bangar’ spelled also as ‘Bhangar,’ is the part beyond the reach of flood waters and is composed of older alluvium of a dark colour of pale reddish brown …”
^ Pakistan: Soils, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2010, http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1404392/bhangar, “… khaddar soils. Away from the river, toward the middle of the doabs, older alluvial soils (called bangar) are widely distributed …”
^ F.C. Channing, Land Revenue Settlement of the Gurgaon District, Government of India, http://books.google.com/books?id=75kIAAAAQAAJ, “… The rates here applied were the same as those applied in the Bangar and Khadar circles and the same comparisons hold good …”
^ Oswald Wood, R. Maconachie, Final report on the settlement of land revenue in the Delhi District, Government of India, 1882, http://books.google.com/books?id=23EIAAAAQAAJ, “… The Khadar-Bangar chak lies along the river; 37 villages are purely Khadar and 39 partly Khadar partly Bangar. The villages nearest the river are subject to inundations, but where the water runs off in time, the natural fertility of the …”
^ “मथुरा-वृंदावन पालिकाओं का अस्तित्व होगा खत्म (Mathura-Vrindavan municipalities will cease operations)”, Dainik Jagran, http://in.jagran.yahoo.com/news/local/uttarpradesh/4_1_5844146.html, “… मथुरा नगर पालिका सीमा में मुर्शिदपुर बांगर, औरंगाबाद बांगर, दामोदरपुरा बांगरपुरा, दामोदरपुरा खादर, रांची बांगर, रांची बांगर खादर, कोयला अलीपुर बांगर, खादर, बाद, आजमपुर, नवादा, तंतूरा, बिर्जापुर, नरहौली, महौली, पालीखेड़ा, वाकलपुर, गनेशरा, सलेमपुर, छरौरा, गिरधरपुर, ईशापुर, लोहवन, गौसना को जोड़ा जाएगा …”
Retrieved from “http://mediawiki.dp.teoma.com/wiki/Khadir_and_Bangar”
Categories: Landforms of India | Landforms of Pakistan
The content on this page originates from Wikipedia and is licensed under the GNU Free Document License or the Creative Commons CC-BY-SA license.

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3

Khadir and Bangar
From Wikipedia(View original Wikipedia Article) Last modified on 11 January 2011 at 03:07
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

In any doab, khadir land (green) lies next to a river, while bangar land (olive) has greater elevation and lies further from the riverKhādir and Bāngar (Hindi-Urdu: खादर और बांगर, کهادر اور بانگر) are terms used in Hindi-Urdu, Punjabi and Sindhi in the Indo-Gangetic plains of North India and Pakistan to differentiate between two types of river plains and alluvial soils. Khadir or Khadar plains are those that are low-lying next to a river. Khadir areas are prone to flooding and sometimes include portions of former river-beds that became available for agriculture when a river changed course.[1] Khadir soil consists of new alluvial deposits and is often very fertile. Bangar plains are more upland, and consist of older alluvial soil. Bangar areas are less prone to flooding but are usually more sandy and less fertile as well.[2][3]

Since North India and Pakistan are coursed by a multiplicity of Himalayan rivers that divide the plains into doabs (i.e. regions between two rivers), the Indo-Gangetic plains consist of alternating regions of river, khadir and bangar. The centers of the doabs consist of bangar and the peripheries, which line the rivers, consist of khadir.[4] Historically, villages in the doabs have been officially classified as khadir, khadir-bangar (i.e. mixed) or bangar for many centuries and different agricultural tax rates applied based on a tiered land-productivity scale.[5][6] In some areas, these terms have become incorporated in several village names themselves, such as Murshidpur Bangar and Ranchi Bangar-Khadir in Mathura district of Uttar Pradesh.[7]

References
^ Yash Pal Singh, भूगोल (Geography), VK Publications, ISBN 9788189611217, http://books.google.com/books?id=dzSfcInDKD8C, “… मैदान के उस भाग को बांगर कहते हैं जहाँ नदियों की बाढ़ का पानी नहीं पहुंच पाता … पुरानी जलोढ़ मिट्टी … खादर: यह वह क्षेत्र है जहाँ नदियों की बाढ़ का जल प्रतिवर्ष आ जाता है …”
^ Alexander Macaulay Markham, Report on the Tenth Revision of Settlement, http://books.google.com/books?id=rpsIAAAAQAAJ, “… The open plain country of Bijnour is, in common parlance, divided into two portions – ‘Khadir’ or low-lying land and ‘Bangar’ or upland …”
^ Shahnaz Parveen, Changing face and challenges of urbanization: a case study of Uttar Pradesh, Concept Publishing Company, 2005, ISBN 9788180692376, http://books.google.com/books?id=q_siAxtwoawC, “… Lithologically and structurally, the Ganga-Yamuna Plain is divided into ‘Bangar’ and ‘Khadar’. ‘Bangar’ spelled also as ‘Bhangar,’ is the part beyond the reach of flood waters and is composed of older alluvium of a dark colour of pale reddish brown …”
^ Pakistan: Soils, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2010, http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1404392/bhangar, “… khaddar soils. Away from the river, toward the middle of the doabs, older alluvial soils (called bangar) are widely distributed …”
^ F.C. Channing, Land Revenue Settlement of the Gurgaon District, Government of India, http://books.google.com/books?id=75kIAAAAQAAJ, “… The rates here applied were the same as those applied in the Bangar and Khadar circles and the same comparisons hold good …”
^ Oswald Wood, R. Maconachie, Final report on the settlement of land revenue in the Delhi District, Government of India, 1882, http://books.google.com/books?id=23EIAAAAQAAJ, “… The Khadar-Bangar chak lies along the river; 37 villages are purely Khadar and 39 partly Khadar partly Bangar. The villages nearest the river are subject to inundations, but where the water runs off in time, the natural fertility of the …”
^ “मथुरा-वृंदावन पालिकाओं का अस्तित्व होगा खत्म (Mathura-Vrindavan municipalities will cease operations)”, Dainik Jagran, http://in.jagran.yahoo.com/news/local/uttarpradesh/4_1_5844146.html, “… मथुरा नगर पालिका सीमा में मुर्शिदपुर बांगर, औरंगाबाद बांगर, दामोदरपुरा बांगरपुरा, दामोदरपुरा खादर, रांची बांगर, रांची बांगर खादर, कोयला अलीपुर बांगर, खादर, बाद, आजमपुर, नवादा, तंतूरा, बिर्जापुर, नरहौली, महौली, पालीखेड़ा, वाकलपुर, गनेशरा, सलेमपुर, छरौरा, गिरधरपुर, ईशापुर, लोहवन, गौसना को जोड़ा जाएगा …”
Retrieved from “http://mediawiki.dp.teoma.com/wiki/Khadir_and_Bangar”
Categories: Landforms of India | Landforms of Pakistan
The content on this page originates from Wikipedia and is licensed under the GNU Free Document License or the Creative Commons CC-BY-SA license.

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About preetlari

"Preetlari", Punjab's magazine established in 1933 and published from Preetnagar, Dist. Amritsar. S. Gurbaksh Singh founded the magazine and also the model village, Preetnagar. The magazine is running in its 78th year and since last year is being taken by nearly 20000 primary and upper primary schools of Punjab ,too.

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  1. Bangar surname may mean this:
    From the ancient delta like land ,which used to be very fertile long ago but the river etc changed its course and therefore this land ,now high with deposited silt, is left to a side and the river etc is making new lands fertile. therefore people from dense forest like growth of trees and vegetation.Older settled people.

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