Monthly Archives: September 2011

Ludhiana textile workers on strike

Standard

Their everyday expenses need a helping hand perhaps..till the strike is over successfully.

— On Wed, 9/21/11, Lakhwinder <lakhwinder0143@yahoo.co.in> wrote:

From: Lakhwinder <lakhwinder0143@yahoo.co.in>
Subject: Ludhiana textile workers on strike
To:
Date: Wednesday, September 21, 2011, 6:23 PM

प्रैस विज्ञप्ति

सैंकड़ों टेक्सटाइल मज़दूर ने किया हड़ताल पर जाने का फैसलामाँगे माने जाने तक कारखाने ठप्प रहेंगे

21 सितम्बर 2011, लुधियाना- आज श्रम कार्यालय पर टेक्सटाइल मजदूरों ने श्रम विभाग व टेक्सटाइल मालिकों के खिलाफ अपनी माँगों को लेकर जमकर प्रदर्शन किया। शक्ति नगर, गौशाला, कश्मीर नगर, माधोपुरी, मोतीनगर तथा लुधियाना के अन्य इलाकों के टेक्सटाइल कारखानों के मजदूरों ने माँग उठाई कि बढ़ी महँगाई के हिसाब से उनके वेतन-पीस रेट बढ़ाए जाएँ, इ.एस.आई., पी.एफ., बोनस, छुट्टियाँ आदि सारे अधिकार जो कानून के मुताबिक लागू किए जाने होते हैं, वे लागू किए जाएँ। मजदूरों के प्रदर्शन को टेक्सटाइल मज़दूर यूनियन के संयोजक राजविन्दर, समिती सदस्यों विश्वनाथ, प्रेमनाथ, ताज मोहम्मद, सुरिन्दर, कारखाना मजदूर यूनियन के संयोजक लखविन्दर आदि ने सम्बोधित किया।
श्रम कार्यालय पर श्रम कमिश्नर श्री आर. के. गर्ग की उपस्थिति में हूई मालिकों के प्रतिनिधियों और मजदूरों के प्रतिनिथियों के बीच में हूई बातचीत में कोई नतीजा नहीं निकला। मालिक मजदूरों का कोई भी हक देने को तैयार नहीं हो रहे । वे श्रम कानूनों को लागू करने से पूरी तरह इनकार कर रहे हैं। श्रम विभाग पूरी तरह मालिकों के इशारे पर काम कर रहा है। श्रम कानूनों को लागू करवाने की अपनी कानूनी जिम्मेवारी निभाने से श्रम विभाग कन्नी कतरा रहा है। मज़दूर प्रतिनिधिओं का कहना है कि श्रम विभाग अधिकारी भ्रष्टाचार में डूबे हूए हैं और मालिकों के इशारों पर मज़दूरों के साथ अन्याय कर रहे है
मालिकों के साथ बातचीत नाकाम हो जाने के बाद मज़दूरों की हूई संयुक्त मीटिंग में फैसला किया गया कि 22 सितम्बर से लगभग 85 कारखानों के सैंकड़ों म•ादूर हड़ताल पर चले जाएँगे। म•ादूरों ने प्रण किया कि जब तक मालिक मज़दूरों की माँगे नहीं मानते तब तक कारखाने बंद रहेंगे।
जारीकर्ता-
राजविन्दर,
संयोजक, टेक्सटाइल मज़दूर यूनियन।
फोन नं- 988886 55663
नोट- सहायक श्रम कमिशनर, श्री राजकुमार गर्ग का फोन नम्बर: 94174 02011

FULL MOON NIGHT storyshow BY POONAM AT PREETNAGAR,DISTT AMRITSAR.STARTING7 PM.

Status

VEENA VERMA’s story KHUNDD GHARRISNI WILL BE SOLO READ-PERFORMED by poonam AT VPO  PREETNAGAR DIstt ASR ; PREET GHAR’S BIG BIG ROOFTOP , GOBAR LIPPYA , opensky theatre  ON the 14th of OCT Friday evening:  beginning celebrations of, hopefully, every FULL MOON NIGHT(PUNNYA) AT 6.45 PM.Come give moral support! the performing team will be slowly increasing in number..!

 ONE HOUR SHOW.  KATHA-RAS-is

Cultural Function: Invitation for the Yamla Jatt 11th Memorial Mela

Standard

UNIQUE HOMAGE TO YAMLA JATT EVERY YEAR.

— On Fri, 9/23/11, Rajinder Brar <rajinder_brar@dot.ca.gov> wrote:

From: Rajinder Brar <rajinder_brar@dot.ca.gov>
Subject: Cultural Function: Invitation for the Yamla Jatt 11th Memorial Mela
To: Social@dot.ca.gov
Date: Friday, September 23, 2011, 9:10 PM

Hello dear friends !!
It is our pleasure to cordially invite you and your loved ones, friends,
relatives and all other connected relations at this function. In
advance, lots to thanks for your valuable time and dedication for our
prominent culture.

Looking forward to seeing you at this annual function.

(See attached file: Tunkar11eng[1].doc)

With regards,
Rajinder Brar (Raj Brar) and ULCYJMF Committee Members
(559)824-9028(C)834-2222(H)445-6236(F)

New Dates for Multilogue on Socio-Political Response to Environmental toxicity , Health and Ecological Crisis in Punjab

Standard

From: Umendra Dutt <umendradutt@gmail.com>
To: punjabeco-crisis <punjabeco-crisis@googlegroups.com>; womenactionforecology@googlegroups.com; greedfreechd@googlegroups.com
Sent: Friday, 16 September 2011, 15:06
Subject: New Dates for Multilogue on Socio-Political Response to Environmental toxicity , Health and Ecological Crisis in Punjab

DUE TO SOME UNAVIODABLE RESONS DATES OF MULTILOGUE ARE CHANGED ..NEW DATES ARE 28-29 October 2011
Multilogue on
Sociopolitical Response to Environmental toxicity , Health and Ecological Crisis in Punjab

Friday-Satruday: 28-29 October 2011
Vanue: CRRID, Madya Marg, Chandigarh.

Dear Friends

In continuation of its efforts to build a civil society movement on the issues of Environmental toxicity , Health and Ecological Crisis in Punjab, KVM in partnership with SADED New Delhi and CRRID Chandigarh has decided to organise a Multilogue on 28-29 October 2011 with participation from medical professionals, toxicologists, ecologists, social scientists , agriculture experts, organic farmers, farmers’ Unions , Political parties and other important stack holders.
Eminent Environment Activist Sunita Narayan, Director, CSE , New Delhi will inaugurate the multilogue . Eminent Environment Epidemiologist Dr S G Kabra , Jaipur will deliver key-note address. Eminent Environment toxicologist Dr Padama Vanekar , Head of Ecology Lab, IIT, Kanpur will also present her findings on pesticides and toxicity.
Please block your dates NOW.
Other details shall be posted later on .

regards
Umendra Dutt

alternative to Nobel: Right Livelihood Awards to be announced Sept 29

Standard

— On Mon, 9/19/11, Right Livelihood Award <noreply@rightlivelihood.org> wrote:

From: Right Livelihood Award <noreply@rightlivelihood.org>
Subject: Right Livelihood Awards to be announced Sept 29
To: “2 – press” <preetlarhi@yahoo.com>
Date: Monday, September 19, 2011, 7:22 PM

Email not displaying properly? Click here to view it in your browser
Award Laureates Propose a Candidate Support the Award
The Rightlivelihood Award
Press Release September 19th
2011 Right Livelihood Awards to be announced on September 29th

The Right Livelihood Award Foundation will announce its 2011 Laureates at a press conference in the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Press Room, Stockholm, on September 29th at 10 am CET.

The Award, often referred to as the ‘Alternative Nobel Prize’, recognises the work of some of the world’s most courageous and inspiring people. One in four of its past recipients is under threat because their work for positive change challenges powerful interests.

Ole von Uexkull, Executive Director, and Monika Griefahn, Co-Chair and member of the Jury of the Foundation, will be present at the press conference to announce the new Award recipients and to answer your questions.

This year, the number of nominations reached a new record: 123 proposals from 59 countries, out of which 54 candidates are from “developing” countries.

Laureates are recognised for their dedication to ecological, social and political causes. The prize money in 2010 was 50,000 € for each of the four recipients and is used for ongoing successful work.

Date & Place of Announcement

Press conference: Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Press Room
Address: Fredsgatan 4-6, Stockholm (Journalist ID required)
Time: 29 September 2011, 10.00 am CET

Website: http://www.rightlivelihood.org
Time: 29 September 2011, 10.00 am CET

Background

The Right Livelihood Award was founded in 1980 by Jakob von Uexkull, who contributed the original funding. Since then, the Award has been supported by individual donors. Its aim is “to honour and support those offering practical and exemplary answers to the most urgent challenges facing us today”.

Today, there are 141 Laureates from 59 countries. For statistics about the Prize, please click here.

Previous Laureates include: Daniel Ellsberg (USA), Vandana Shiva (India), Wangari Maathai (Kenya) and Ken Saro-Wiwa (Nigeria).

The Award will be presented at a ceremony in the Swedish Parliament on December 5, 2011, at 6 pm hosted by the Society for the Right Livelihood Award in the Swedish Parliament. A press conference with the 2011 Laureates will take place the same day at 9.30 am.

Contact

RIGHT LIVELIHOOD AWARD FOUNDATION
Birgit Jaeckel, Communications Consultant;
Kajsa Övergaard, Foundation Manager
Phone: +46 8 70 20 340, Fax: +46 8 70 20 338
Cell phone: +49 170 24 49 348
info[at]rightlivelihood.org

For UK media:
UK Press Office
Deepa Vyas
info[at]kinrossrender.com
+44 (0) 207 378 1234

For German, Austrian and Swiss media:
Holger Michel
info[at]holger-michel.eu
+49 (0)30 23 63 48 83
+49 (0)178 662 36 79

You are receiving this e-mail because you subscribed to the Right Livelihood Award Newsletter
If you wish to unsubscribe from our e-news, please click here

The Right Livelihood Award Foundation
PO Box 15072, 104 65 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: +46 (0) 8 702 03 40 or 702 03 39; Fax: +46 (0)8 702 03 38
info@rightlivelihood.org
www.rightlivelihood.org

Sikh-Diaspora Digest Number 5035 from J’S’Tiwana

Standard

— On Tue, 9/20/11, Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com <Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

From: Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com <Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Sikh-Diaspora] Digest Number 5035
To: Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 10:45 PM

Sikh-Diaspora

Messages In This Digest (9 Messages)

1. ‘Patit’, and indelibly inked From: J.S.Tiwana 2a. Re: looking back: SGPC has weathered many a political storm From: J.S.Tiwana 3. Sikh Identity: A Fading Image? From: J.S.Tiwana 4. Simranjit Singh Mann and son lost SGPC election From: J.S.Tiwana 5. The race for SGPC chief’s post hots up From: J.S.Tiwana 6. Brahmins following Sikh ‘maryada’ denied voting rights From: J.S.Tiwana 7a. Re: So-called Patits and Sikh Pantheon From: Tejinder Lamba 8. Motorcycle helmets an election issue for Sikhs From: J.S.Tiwana 9. Re So-called Patits and Sikh Pantheon From: Nirmal Singh
View All Topics | Create New Topic

Messages

1.

‘Patit’, and indelibly inked

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:43 pm (PDT)

‘Patit’, and indelibly inked

[]

Sikh men with trimmed beard & shorn hair find
name in electoral rolls, vote with élan,
Sehajdharis too exercise their franchise

Giving two hoots to a directive issued by the
Gurdwara Election Commission (GEC) that only
Keshdhari Sikhs (those with unshorn hair) can
vote in the SGPC elections, a large number of
`Patit Sikhs’ (those with trimmed beard and hair)
were seen exercising their franchise across
Punjab on Sunday. A number of women who have
their eyebrows plucked, and are thus ineligible
for voting, were seen casting votes.

It may be noted that the the GEC had warned that
if any non Keshdhari Sikh was found voting in the
elections, they would be arrested. The warning,
however, had little effect. A prominent person
with trimmed beard who voted in the SGPC polls
was Amarjit Amri, the brother of Shiromani Akali
Dal’s Jalandhar unit president Gurcharan Singh
Channi. Amri even showed the black indelible ink
mark on his finger for the benefit of the media
after casting his vote in a booth in Jalandhar city.

http://www.indianex press.com/ news/-Patit- –and-indelibly- inked/848404/

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
2a.

Re: looking back: SGPC has weathered many a political storm

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:44 pm (PDT)

>>>On behalf of the processionists, Professor Harkishen Singh Bajwa
requested the priests thrice to accept the “Prasad” but they refused.
When two other prominent leaders of that time, Kartar Singh Jhabbar
and Teja Singh Bhuchar, reached Sri Harmandar Sahib, it was decided
to take “hukamnama” from Sri Guru Granth Sahib…Priests were left
with no choice but to perform “ardas” and accept the “Prasad”. <<<

A slightly different version is given In “Akali Morche ate Jhabar” by
Narain Singh, published by SGPC

First of all it was Prof. Bawa Harkishan Singh, not Professor
Harkishen Singh Bajwa who was present there.

Before the arrival of Kartar Singh Jhabbar, the priests had refused
to accept Parsad of Ramdasia Sikhs and recite Ardas for them. On
their refusal Bawa Harkishan Singh asked a Sikh student to recite
Ardas. So when Karah Parsad was being distributed, Kartar Singh
Jhabbar and Teja Singh Bhuchar arrived there. Here Jhabbar took over
and dictated the terms.

He asked the student to stop distributing Ardas. He then told the
priests to behave and do their duty otherwise they would be
physically thrown out. ‘This holy place is not your
personal property. it belongs to the Sikh Panth’.
One of the priests got up in protest and said, ” Get up, let us go”.
Jhabbar ji further pressed.” That is fine, now get out”. Then two
priests persuaded other priests not to go and they all sat down.
Jhabbar ji again yelled at them, ” oie, you have sat down again !”
One of them replied ‘we want to think about it’. After a while. they
agreed to do Ardas and distribute karah parsad of Ramdasia Sikhs.
After the Ardas, one of the priests took the Vaak which was in favor
of the downtrodden people.

“God forgives even those who are without merit,
And assembles them all in his skirt,
And ferries them across through the Guru’s boat”
Sorath M 3

This settled the issue to all’s satisfaction.

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (2)
3.

Sikh Identity: A Fading Image?

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:44 pm (PDT)

Sikh Identity: A Fading Image?

September 19, 2011 by abowen Source:
<http://blog. beliefnet. com/projectconve rsion/2011/ 09/sikh-identity -a-fading- image.html>blog.beliefnet. com

One of the most pervasive jokes about United
States Marines is how neat and particular they
are. Nowhere is this concept more pronounced than
Basic Training. Everything must be just so: Your
rack (bunk or bed) must be made to certain
dimensions, boots shined (when they used black
“jungle boots”) to a specific sheen, your face
shaved a specific way, every ribbon, medal,
chevron, lace, thread placed exactly so, every
rifle movement had to snap and pop in perfect unison.

We, the recruits, would lie in bed at night
groaning about how none of these anal rules made
any sense. “Why can’t I scratch an itch?” was a
common complaint. The worst thing was, the Drill
Instructors seldom gave us a reason…but we were
always told the reason would save our lives.
Ah (9K)

Ah…the memories. And their breath was always minty fresh.

In many ways, Sikhi culture–especially the
youth–face the same problem. An older generation
may tell them how important it is to wear the
Five K’s (comb, unshorn hair, the blade, special
shorts, and the steel bracelet), but the youth
are left wondering why. The problem is especially
profound here in America, where the younger
generation is raised as a cultural minority. They may ask themselves:

Why don’t other people observe these practices?
All my friends are talking about shaving now. Why can’t I?
Will everyone make fun of me because of my hair/turban?
I’m the only Sikh in my school. I just want to
fit in and stop being looked at differently…

Regardless of the importance in wearing the Five
K’s, I think these are worthy and legitimate
concerns that every Sikhi family should address
with their children. Growing up is about
discovering who you are in the world, what your
role is, and staking out that existence. If you
as a parent or influential adult simply say “We
wear the Five K’s because Guru Gobind Singh told
us to,” then you’ll lose your kids. No one likes
that answer. We didn’t like it in Boot Camp and
kids today certainly won’t either.

On the other hand, there are plenty of websites
and articles talking about the so-called mystic
and scientific reasons behind why growing out
your hair is important. Here’s one about how the
hair actually serves as a neuro antenna. I’ve
read several heart-felt letters from a man to his
son about why wearing the Kesh (unshorn hair) and
turban are so critical. Judging by the growing
number of campaigns fighting to keep this
tradition alive, the problem must be serious.

So my question for the Sikhi youth (and even
adults) is, why not? Why be ashamed of the Kesh
or the turban? If youthful vibrance is about
being bold, standing out, declaring your
identity, why not embrace an aspect of your
culture–your religion–that historically makes you
so? Guru Gobind Singh once said that he
established the uniform of the Khalsa that you
might “Stand out as one among millions.”

Sikh-Andrew (15K)
And why should you stand out? What’s the big deal
about being a Sikh? A Sikh stands up. Remember
how Guru Nanak spoke out boldly against the
religious persecution of the Mughal invaders and
demanded human equality? Or how about how Guru
Amar Das, in observing strict equality, said that
even the Emperor of India had to first sit among
and eat with the lowest of society before meeting
the Guru? Oh, and then there’s Guru Tegh Bahadur
who laid down his life in order to protect the
religious freedom of a religion other than his own?

And what about every Sikhi martyr–men and
women–who have fought (both in legal matters and
on the battlefield) for the identity you struggle with today?

When you take the Amrit baptism, you aren’t
simply initiated into a faith, it’s a pledge of
allegiance to an ideal and a culture. The Five K’s are your uniform.

Every one of the Five K’s has meaning, and I go
over those meanings in this post. I admit, when I
first starting wearing the Five K’s, when my
beard started growing out, when I grumbled in
frustration over tying the turban, I thought the
very same thing that these youth do. Must I really wear this to be a good Sikh?

Absolutely.

You can’t be a Marine without the uniform and
everything on that uniform has a purpose. Sikhs
say the following Chandi Charitra prayer as they take the Amrit baptism:

“Grant me this strength, O God:
That I may never deter from righteous deeds.
I may fear none, when I go fighting the evil,
And with confidence in You, come out victorious.
Your Glory may be ingrained in my mind,
And singing Your praises be my highest ambition.
When this mortal frame reaches its end,
I may die fighting with limitless courage,
For the establishment of righteousness.”
speaking-at- gurdwara1 (11K)

Me speaking at the Charlotte gurdwara about my
Sikhi experience and Sikhi identity.
Now, I understand why I wear these items. I
understand who I am as an honorary Sikh and
who/what I stand for. A Sikh defends the weak,
fights for the oppressed, and stands as a beacon
of stability, valor, and honor. When there’s a
Sikh wearing the Five K’s in the room, you know
he/she has you covered. By the same token, the
uniform of the Khalsa (a baptized Sikh) isn’t to
be worn lightly. This isn’t something do just
because your parents did. Each baptism is a
unique declaration of faith and fidelity to God
and mankind to uphold honorable values. You may
be a part of the Panth (world community of
Khalsa), but you are an individual sentry on the watch against tyranny.

If you are a Sikh youth and wavering on this
issue, I humbly suggest you really explore your
reasons for not wearing the Five K’s. Go to your
parents, find older Sikhs who’ve gone through the
same issue, read the example of other Sikhs, and
go to Waheguru–that wonderful light which dispels
all darkness–for guidance. You don’t have to wear
the Five K’s to be a good person, but if you want
to be part of the “Army of the Lord,” you have to wear the uniform.

Waheguru ji ka Khalsa! Waheguru ji ki Fateh !
(To God belongs the Khalsa, To God belongs the Victory!)

http://www.sikhnet. com/news/ sikh-identity- fading-image

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
4.

Simranjit Singh Mann and son lost SGPC election

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:45 pm (PDT)

Simranjit Singh Mann and son lost SGPC election

Punjab Newsline Network

Monday, 19 September 2011

By Gurpreet Singh Mehak
FATEHGARH SAHIB: SAD (Amritsar) president and former Member
Parliament Simranjit Singh Mann, who had contest SGPC election from
Bassi Pathana constituency has lost election. His son Imaan Singh
Mann has also lost his seat.

Though the result will be declared official on September 22 but
according to information received from counting centres of
the constituency, Mann had lost election from former Minister and
SAD candidate Randhir Singh Cheema.

Cheema defeated Khalistan ideologue Simranjit Singh Mann and another
Khalistan ideologue and SAD(Panch Pardhani) leader Harpal Singh
Cheema. On Bassi Pathana reserve seat SAD candidate Avtar
Singh Riya defeated SAD(Amritsar) candidate Dharam Singh Kalaur and
Panthic Morcha candidate Santokh Singh Salana.

It is recalled that Mann had decided not to make an alliance with
Panthic Morcha to indirectly benefit SAD(Badal). Had he opted to go
with Panthic Morcha he would have won his election and SAD(Badal)
would have lost many seats in Fatehgarh Sahib and Patiala districts.

http://www.punjabne wsline.com/ content/simranji t-singh-mann- and-son-lost- sgpc-election/ 33287

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
5.

The race for SGPC chief’s post hots up

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:45 pm (PDT)

The race for SGPC chief’s post hots up
Sarbjit Dhaliwal & Perneet Singh/TNS

Chandigarh/Amritsar , Sept 19
With the Shiromani Akali Dal sweeping the SGPC elections, the race
for presidentship of the premier Sikh religious body is set to hot up
in the coming days. It will not be easy for SAD chief patron and
Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal to chose the next SGPC president
with several senior leaders in race for the post. Badal, who is
invariably authorised by party members to name the president, has
always sprung a surprise with his choice of president.

[]

In 1999, he named Bibi Jagir Kaur as SGPC president, the first woman
to head the religious body. Years later, he outwitted several senior
leaders, naming Kirpal Singh Badungar as SGPC chief. He was, perhaps,
the first leader from the Backward Classes to head the SGPC. In 2005,
Badal named Avtar Singh Makkar as president to counter the influence
of Delhi’s Paramjit Singh Sarna and his brother among the urban Sikh
electorate. None had expected the move. Badal may spring a surprise
this time too. Sources say he may name a Dalit as the next SGPC
president. “This would pay the SAD rich dividends in the ensuing
assembly elections. It could be a masterstroke to win over the
support of the Dalits,” said a senior leader. Those in the race for
the coveted post are incumbent Avtar Singh Makkar, who has led the
SGPC six times in a row, the second highest after SAD stalwart GS
Tohra. Makkar’s stint as SGPC chief has been largely
non-controversial and he has been loyal to the Badal family. Punjab
Education Minister Sewa Singh Sekhwan is also one of the contenders.
His appointment would help the party consolidate its votebank in the
Majha region. The possibility of Minister Sucha Singh Langah heading
the SGPC can’t be ruled out either for this reason.

The name of former Minister Tota Singh has been doing the rounds ever
since the SGPC poll process started. Among the women contenders,
former SGPC chief Bibi Jagir Kaur’s name is at the top. However, the
criminal case against her may prove to be a stumbling block. Also in
the race is former SGPC general secretary Bibi Kiranjot Kaur.

http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2011/20110920/ main4.htm

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
6.

Brahmins following Sikh ‘maryada’ denied voting rights

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:45 pm (PDT)

Brahmins following Sikh ‘maryada’ denied voting rights
Balwant Garg /TNS

Muktsar, September 19
In Faridkot and Muktsar districts, hundreds of ‘patit’ and
‘Sehajdhari’ Sikhs with shorn hair across the state cast their vote
in gurdwara elections on Sunday. But over 1,000 Brahmins in two
villages of the area were debarred from exercising franchise despite
the fact that they sport long hair and beard, closely resemble the
Sikhs, are agrarians, attire like Sikhs and believe in the Sikh philosophy.

One of these villages is situated in Muktsar and the other is in
Faridkot. But the name of both the villages is same: Bahamanwala.
These villages derived their name long time back as majority of the
residents were Brahmins.

Though not born into Sikh families, for decades they have been
following the Sikh tenets. They go to the gurdwara and lead their
life as per the Sikh ‘maryada’.

“But as our names do not carry Singh or Kaur, we have been debarred
from exercising franchise during the SGPC polls,” said Ram Ji Dass, a
former sarpanch of Bahamanwala (Muktsar). The village has only five
Jat Sikh families. “The only reason we were not registered as voters
was because we are seen as pro-Congress, ” said Desh Raj, a resident.
Just 26 km from this Bahamanwala (Muktsar) village is another by the
same name in Faridkot. This village has 373 registered SGPC voters,
12 of them Brahmins. Only one was allowed to vote.

http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2011/20110920/ punjab.htm# 3

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
7a.

Re: So-called Patits and Sikh Pantheon

Posted by: “Tejinder Lamba” tejilamba@yahoo.com tejilamba

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:45 pm (PDT)

“The term ‘patit’ is arrogant to begin with. There is no place in Sikh of the AGGS for such value judgements.” Sdn A Singh

I have a naive question.

In India & Pakistan, all those who do not pay taxes on their Income are called Tax-Chor. My information is that Mahan & Prasid Ragees, Kathwachaks, Granthis especially in Diaspora, who preach ‘Truth is high, but truthful living is higher’ (AGGS/ p 62), earning lot of money think it’s simply somebody else’s problem.

Will it be arrogant to call them ‘Chor’/’Haramkhor’ , since these words do occur in AGGS, or just name them ‘Patit’.

tejinder singh
Edmonton, Ca

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (3)
8.

Motorcycle helmets an election issue for Sikhs

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:45 pm (PDT)

* By Ashley Csanady, Record staff
* Mon Sep 19 2011

Motorcycle helmets an election issue for Sikhs

KITCHENER ­ Ajmer S. Mandur has had his
motorcycle licence for more than two decades, but
he hasn’t actually ridden a motorcycle in this province since the early 1990s.

He used to let his hair down ­ literally ­ and
hop on for a ride. But since getting married and
having kids, he doesn’t want to break with his faith.

Mandur is a Khalsa Sikh, which means he observes
a religious practice that forbids cutting,
trimming or otherwise removing any hair on his
body. He’s also required to wear a dastaar, or turban.

“I really don’t like to be in public with no
turban,” Mandur said. “It’s just the way I was raised.”

He’s just one of many Sikhs in Ontario calling
for an exemption to the province’s motorcycle
helmet law. They cite freedom of religion with an increasingly unified voice.

On Sept. 11, members of the regional Sikh
community met at a Kitchener gurdwara, or temple,
to lend their names and voices to a growing
petition that seeks an exemption to the helmet law for turban-wearing Sikhs.

Of the more than 30 men present, both young and
old said they would buy a motorcycle if the law was amended.

The Ontario Highway Traffic Act currently
requires all motorcyclists to wear a helmet. This
poses a problem for Sikhs, whose turbans don’t fit under most helmets.

The Highway Traffic Act also requires anyone
under the age of 18 to wear a helmet while
bicycling. While the Canadian Sikh Association
would like this amended as well, it’s focusing on motorcycles.

“Asking someone to take off their turban is
literally like asking them to take off their
clothes. That’s how it’s viewed,” said Baljit
Singh Ghuman, chair of the Canadian Sikh
Association. “It’s part of the religion. It’s part of the lifestyle.”

The Canadian Sikh Association organized the
meeting. It’s been holding similar public
meetings in Sikh communities throughout the
province in the run-up to the Oct. 6 provincial election.

“This is the one issue the whole community seems
to be united behind,” said Ghuman.

Both British Columbia and Manitoba have
exemptions in their helmet laws for
turban-wearing Sikhs, but an Ontario Superior
Court Justice dismissed a challenge to the law in 2008.

In 2008, the most recent data available, 53
people died in motorcycle accidents in Ontario
(three of them were passengers).

In an analysis of factors that contributed to
those fatalities, 9.8 per cent were found to be a
result of the rider not wearing a helmet.

But 51 per cent died as a result of speed and the driver losing control.

An analysis of the data dating back to 1993 shows
this ratio is relatively consistent: the
percentage of fatalities attributed to speed
ranges from 43 per cent to 60 per cent, while the
percentage of fatalities attributed to not
wearing a helmet ranges from five per cent to 18 per cent.

The Ministry of Transportation stated its
position in an email: “Research has shown that
motorcycle helmets are effective in reducing the
incidence of head injury … This focus (on safety)
is one of the reasons why Ontario has the safest roads in North America.”

It also pointed out that, “The Ontario Court of
Justice recently ruled that Ontario’s mandatory
helmet requirement does not infringe upon the
freedom of religion or equality rights of the
Charter, nor violates the Human Rights Code.”

The Ministry cites a 1996 study that found
motorcycle helmets were 67 per cent effective in
preventing serious brain injury, and a 2004 study
showed they were 37 per cent effective in preventing fatal injuries.

But some suggest that at over 50 kilometres an
hour, helmets do not affect an accident’s outcome.

The last time the helmet issue was brought to
Queen’s Park was in 1988, when a private member’s
bill that would have granted Sikhs such an exemption failed.

John Milloy, the Kitchener Centre MPP who’s
running for re-election for the Liberals, said
Premier Dalton McGuinty has announced his
intentions to “have a conversation” about the issue should he win re-election.

Milloy said it’s a very complicated issue that
melds public safety and freedom of religion. He
supports his party’s stance and would be open to
having that conversation when the election is over.

J.D. McGuire, who’s running for the Green party
in Kitchener-Waterloo, said in an email that he’s
very open to having a conversation with the Sikh
community about the issue, should he be elected.

“I personally wouldn’t support a law that
endangers any Ontarian,” said Mark Cairns, NDP
candidate for Kitchener-Conestoga , the riding
that contains the temple. “I don’t see how
someone could get away with not wearing their
seatbelt in a car based on some matter of religious freedom.”

Candidates for the Progressive Conservative party
declined to comment on the issue, but the
official party line is “public safety should be the top concern.”

Yet, the B.C. ruling stated the “marginal risk
and costs associated with unhelmeted motorcycle
riding does not constitute undue hardship” to the province.

The 1999 ruling “found that the unhelmeted rider
alone bears the risks associated with riding a motorcycle without a helmet.”

The tribunal’s findings highlighted the fact
that, since motorcyclists are more likely to die
or be seriously injured than automobile drivers,
there’s a certain level of societal risk that’s
accepted. And, as there was insufficient evidence
to prove that unhelmeted riding for as small a
population as the Sikh community posed a
statistically significant risk to public safety,
the tribunal ruled the helmet law was discriminatory.

The practice of not cutting one’s hair (referred
to as Kesh) is one of Sikhism five Ks, rules
every baptized member must follow. Despite the
fact that only Sikh men wear the turban, it is
not a gendered practice. Women are also forbidden
from cutting or otherwise altering any body hair
and are expected to wear the kirpan ­ a small
knife Sikhs carry that’s another of the five Ks.

The kirpan has been another source of controversy
for the faith, as Sikhs have had to fight for
their right to carry what’s perceived as a weapon
into stadiums, public buildings and public schools.

The 2001 census (the last year religious data was
collected until the 2011 numbers are released)
reported just over 77,000 Sikhs in Ontario.
Estimates place the current population at more than 100,000.

<mailto:acsanady@therecord. com>acsanady@therecord. com

http://www.therecor d.com/news/ local/article/ 596936–motorcyc le-helmets- an-election- issue-for- sikhs

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
9.

Re So-called Patits and Sikh Pantheon

Posted by: “Nirmal Singh” enveen@yahoo.com enveen

Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:45 pm (PDT)

Thank you Mrs A Singh for your comments. It is indeed a shame that we chose to use such demeaning judgemental term to designate a group that at the time was miniscule and could therefore be openly stigmstized and ridiculed. To day the numbers are staggering but we continue to use the term yet as is evident from a news item today, most of the voters would still be from this category or worse – even though they will be certified to be observant kesdharis. It just cannot be that there are 55 lakh fully observant kesdharis [no drinking, no shaping of eye brows etc] in those states who are also eager to register as voters for SGPC elections.

I am appending below the write up on Patit in Sikh Encyclopaedia. In spite of some factual errors regarding the SRM provisions, the write up clearly would hold the legal definition inaccurate.
Respectfully,
Nirmal Singh
Camp New Delhi

PATIT, an adjective formed from patan meaning fall, decline or degradation, with its roots in Sanskrit pat which means, variously, “to fall, sink, descend; to fall in the moral sense; to lose caste, rank or position,” usually denotes one who is morally fallen, wicked, degraded or out caste. It is slightly different from the English word `apostate`, which usually stands for one who abandons his religion for another voluntarily or under compulsion. A patit is one who commits a religious misdemeanour or transgression, yet does not forsake his professed faith. He may seek redemption and may be readmitted to the communion after due penitence.

In the sacred literature of the Sikhs as well as of the Hindus, the word is normally used in the general sense of fallen or sinner as opposed to pure or virtuous. It often appears in composite terms such as patitpavan and patitudharan (purifier or redeemer of the sinner) used as attributes of God and Guru. Its use as a technical term in Sikh theology appears to have come into vogue after the creation of the Khalsa and the appearance of various codes of conduct prescribed for the Sikhs in the form of rahitnamas during the eighteenth century. Even the rahitnamas describe transgressor of the code of conduct as tankhahia (one liable to penalty) and not patit.

Bhai Santokh Singh (1787-1843) the poet-historian, appears to be the first to use patit in the sense in which it is now understood among the Sikhs. In ritu 3, ansu 51 of his magnum opus, Sri Gur Pratap Suraj Granth, the poet relates a story, based on an anecdote from an earlier work, Gur Ratan Mal (Sou Sakhi), of a Sikh lady shaken in her faith under the influence of a Muslim woman, who is subsequently reclaimed. She is described as saying: Bakhsh lehu ham tuman sharani; patitin pavanaid bidhi barm (we seek refuge with you [0 Guru:], pardon us and tell us the way to purify patits). The Singh Sabha movement of the last quarter of the nineteenth century had reclamation of the patit Sikhs as one of its major objectives.
Shuddhi Sabha, an offshoot of the Singh Sabha, established in 1893, had as its sole purpose the reconversion of apostates, and reclamation of patits. By a patit was meant a Hindu or Sikh, man or woman, who had abandoned his/her traditional religious faith under Muslim or Christian influence. Also, an initiated Sikh who committed a major kurahit or breach of religious discipline, became a patit, while for minor breaches of the Sikh code, one only became a tankhahia or one liable to penalty or punishment whose misdemeanour could be condoned by sangat or holy fellowship after an apology, repentantly and humbly tendered, and/or a punishment, usually in the form of tankhah (fine) and/or seva (voluntary service) and extra recitation daily of one or more routine prayers.

Sikh Rahit Maryada approved by Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee in 1954 after prolonged deliberations, retains the above rules without specifically defining the term patit. Its legal definition as inserted in the Sikh Gurdwaras Act, 1925, through the amending Act XI of 1944 runs as below: “Patit means a person who being a Kcshdhari Sikh trims or shaves his beard or keshas or who after taking amrit commits any one or more of the four kurahits.” Delhi Sikh Gurdwaras Act, 1971, contains a similar definition except a reference to keshadhari because unlike Sikh Gurdwaras Act, 1925, it defines only keshadharis, and not sahajdharis, as Sikhs. It states: “Patit” means a Sikh who trims or shaves his beard or hair (keshas) or who after taking amrit commits any one or more of the four kurahits.

According to old rahitnamas, as well as the Sikh Rahit Maryada, the four (major) kurahits are (a) trimming or shaving of hair, (2) eating kuttha or halal meat, i.e. flesh of bird or animal slaughtered in the Muslim`s way; (3) sexual contact with a woman or man other than one`s own wife or husband; and (4) the use of tobacco in any form. Being a patit entails several religious, social and even legal disabilities. For example, besides being a religious offence punishable by sangat, being a patit is a social stigma; a patit cannot have his ardas said at any of the five takhts; and a patit cannot be elected to the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee.

The Sikh Rahit Maryada advises Sikhs not to associate generally with patits. Especially, codinig with a patit would make a Sikh tankhahia. A patit who fails to appear before the sangat when summoned, or who refuses to accept its verdict could invite punishment leading to his excommunication from Sikh society. The power of excommunication however vests only in the Akal Takht at Amritsar, the highest seat of religious authority, and is exercised in exceptional cases involving eminent persons and panthic honour. Of course, the sanction behind such punishments and disabilities is purely religious, moral and social pressure, except in cases falling under the Sikh Gurdwaras Act.

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)

Recent Activity
Visit Your Group
Yahoo! Groups
Mental Health Zone
Schizophrenia groups
Find support

New business?
Get new customers.
List your web site
in Yahoo! Search.

Yahoo! Finance
It’s Now Personal
Guides, news,
advice & more.

Need to Reply?
Click one of the “Reply” links to respond to a specific message in the Daily Digest.

Create New Topic | Visit Your Group on the Web
Messages
Copyright (c) 2001-2006 Sikh-Diaspora @Yahoo! Groups. All rights reserved.
SD strives to provide an exceptional platform to achieve thought provoking debates; let your likeminded friends know about Sikh-Diaspora.
To subscribe : Sikh-Diaspora-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

MARKETPLACE
Stay on top of your group activity without leaving the page you’re on – Get the Yahoo! Toolbar now.

Yahoo! Groups
Change settings via the Web (Yahoo! ID required)
Change settings via email: Switch delivery to Individual | Switch format to Traditional
Visit Your Group | Yahoo! Groups Terms of Use | Unsubscribe

Sikh-Diaspora Digest Number 5034

Standard

Sikh-Diaspora

Messages In This Digest (7 Messages)

1. Two senior lawyers fight in the presence of female judge From: J.S.Tiwana 2. SAD-Sant Samaj combine sweeps SGPC elections From: J.S.Tiwana 3. Dangerous portends for SAD, despite win From: J.S.Tiwana 4. ‘Ineligible’ voters have a field day From: J.S.Tiwana 5. 15-Yr Old Sikh-Canadian Tops 6000 Commonwealth Writers: From: J.S.Tiwana 6. The Spirit of Hola Mohalla: A Photo Exhibition From: J.S.Tiwana 7. When Will The Phoenix Rise? From: J.S.Tiwana
View All Topics | Create New Topic

Messages

1.

Two senior lawyers fight in the presence of female judge

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Sun Sep 18, 2011 11:52 pm (PDT)

Two senior lawyers fight in the presence of female judge

Punjab Newsline Network

Sunday, 18 September 2011

FATEHGARH SAHIB: Two senior lawyers from the district courts of
Fatehgarh Sahib did fight intensively in the presence of a female
judge in the court premises recently .

As per the information available, one lawyer had gone to the court
with regard to the hearing of a case. Other lawyers were also present
in the court and the female judge was hearing the proceedings of the
case. The proceedings of the court got interrupted when a senior
advocate who is also the former president of the District Bar
Association entered the court at once and indulged in an abuse with
another senior lawyer.

The former, who was reportedly drunk, alleged that the latter has
stolen his Rs 10,000 . There was much hue and cry in the court
premises when the two advocates indulged in physical fight with each
other. The judge ordered the police to interfere and bring the fight
to an end. According to information received, the judge has started
the necessary action with regard to the fight. When contacted
District Bar Assocation, Fatehgarh Sahib president A.S. Dharni he
said it was an unfortunate incident. He refused to comment further.

http://www.punjabne wsline.com/ content/two- senior-lawyers- fight-presence- female-judge/ 33284

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
2.

SAD-Sant Samaj combine sweeps SGPC elections

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Sun Sep 18, 2011 11:52 pm (PDT)

SAD-Sant Samaj combine sweeps SGPC elections
Bags 157 out of 170 seats; turnout 62%
Polling by and large peaceful
Naveen S Garewal/TNS

Chandigarh, September 18
The Shiromani Akali Dal (SAD)-Sant Samaj alliance swept the Shiromani
Gurdwara Parbandak Committee (SGPC) elections held today. The
alliance won 157 out of 170 seats spread across Punjab, Haryana,
Himachal Pradesh and Chandigarh.

The alliance lost 10 seats in Punjab and three (out of 11) in
Haryana. It won both seats in Himachal Pradesh and Chandigarh. In the
last General House, SAD had won 140 seats, while 30 were bagged by others.

Though, the names of the winners will be notified on September 22,
the counting was done soon after the polling ended and results
declared thereafter.

Punjab witnessed 62.74 per cent polling. The highest voter turnout
was recorded in Nawanshahr (73 per cent) and the lowest in Amritsar
(51 per cent).

The combine lost Sirsa, Ambala and Ambala SC seats in Haryana. In
Punjab, it lost Joga, Garshankar, Hargobindpur, Phillaur, Dhuri,
Dhuri SC, Mohali, Baba Bakala, Jandiala and Dharamkot seats. The
smallest margin of votes was seen in Dharamkot (Moga) where a rebel
candidate Sukhjit Singh Kaka was declared winner by a margin of only 73 votes.

Barring an incident of firing in Kurianwala village of Gidderbaha and
some skirmishes across Punjab, including Buttarshri (Muktsar), the
poll was by and large peaceful, notwithstanding some allegation of
intimidation by non-alliance candidates.

Though, all 28 polling stations in Chandigarh were classified as
sensitive, there was no report of any untoward incident from
Chandigarh, Haryana or Himachal Pradesh.

Surprisingly, the alliance won some of the heavily contested
constituencies, leaving nothing to the share of the main opposition –
the Panthic Morcha and the Shiromani Akali Dal (Amritsar), led by
Simranjit Singh Mann, who incidentally himself lost the poll from
Bassi Pathana. His son Eman Singh mann also lost from Bhagsar (Patiala).

Mann’s party won the Joga seat in Mansa district by defeating the SAD
candidate. Phillaur also saw a close finish with the SAD nominee
losing to the Panthic Morcha by a margin of 213 votes.

There are reports from Badal village that certain non-Keshdharis
caste votes in the poll. All candidates in the poll had to give an
undertaking that they were Keshdhari and did not shear any body hair.

A PPP worker was critically injured in a firing incident at
Kurianwala in Gidderbaha. He was reportedly protesting against
alleged booth capturing. He was taken to a hospital where his
condition was stated to be critical.

poll report

The Winners
* SGPC president Avtar Singh Makkar
* Former SGPC president Bibi Jagir Kaur
* Education Minister Sewa Singh Sekwan
* Agriculture Minister Sucha Singh Langah
* Chandigarh ex-Mayor Harjinder Kaur

The Losers
* SAD (A) president Simranjit S Mann
* Haryana Sikh leader Jagdish Singh Jhinda

The smallest margin of votes was seen in Dharamkot (Moga) where rebel
candidate Sukhjit Singh Kaka won by 73 votes

http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2011/20110919/ main1.htm

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
3.

Dangerous portends for SAD, despite win

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Sun Sep 18, 2011 11:52 pm (PDT)

Dangerous portends for SAD, despite win
Naveen S Garewal
TRibune NEws Service

Chandigarh, September 18
Despite Deputy Chief Minister Sukhbir Badal’s claims that the SGPC
elections were a “semi-final” before the assembly elections, to be
held in about five months from now, the events that took place during
the SGPC elections today, must have made Sukhbir a worried man.

For the first time in 85 years, when the SGPC elections were first
(1926) held, the SAD has had to face a serious opposition. The runup
to the poll was neither smooth nor without resistance.

The mood of jubilation in the Akali camp notwithstanding, realisation
must have dawned on Sukhbir and his father Chief Minister Parkash
Singh Badal that the assembly elections are going to be no cakewalk.
For the SGPC poll, the SAD faced limited opposition (fringe Akali
elements), but for the assembly elections, the opposition would be
larger and stronger. However, the SGPC elections have certainly
helped the Akalis mobilise their cadres for the big fight. A momentum
has been set in motion within the party, which the Congress lacks so
far. The sole activity visible in the Congress camp is Amarinder
meeting party men and addressing gatherings. At several places, these
meetings have seen ugly intra-party feud.

What will be of concern to the Badals is not the number of votes that
their candidates secured in the SGPC elections, but the number of
votes they did not. The Opposition vote in these elections is
extremely significant, especially in places like Gidderbaha.

http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2011/20110919/ punjab.htm# 13

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
4.

‘Ineligible’ voters have a field day

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Sun Sep 18, 2011 11:53 pm (PDT)

‘Ineligible’ voters have a field day
Rajmeet Singh/Tribune News Service

Mohali, September 18
Contrary to the orders of the Sikh Gurdwara Judicial Commission, a
large number of apostate (patit) Sikhs were allowed to cast their
ballot at different polling station across Mohali district.This
facilitated bogus voting, especially in rural areas, to the advantage
of the ruling SAD (Badal).

It rather appeared that the police and the polling staff acted as
facilitators. At the Landran and Kumbra polling booths, some
clean-shaven youths with their heads covered with a cloth were seen
casting their vote. When approached on the matter, musclemen
reportedly engaged by the ruling party tried to whisk away the
“ineligible” voters. At polling booths, there were complaints of
bogus votes having been cast in the morning hours. The polling staff,
on noticing mediapersons, stopped some apostate Sikhs from entering
the polling booth, only to be allowed inside after the mediapersons had left.

With no objection by the polling staff and polling agents of
different candidates in the fray, non-eligible voters had easy access
to the polling booths.The policemen posted in and outside the polling
booths remained mute spectators to the glaring violation. The
District Electoral Officer-cum- Deputy Commissioner Varun Roozam had
said the election staff had been categorically instructed not to
allow Sehajdhari Sikhs to cast their vote. But those in charge of
polling booths at various places said they were allowing all those
whose name figured in the voters’ list to cast their ballot.

In Chandigarh, over 68 per cent polling was recorded from the lone
Chandigarh seat As many as 10,962 voters of the total of about 16,000
voters cast their vote.

Former Mayor Harjinder Kaur of the ruling SAD(B), Gurnam Singh Sidhu
and Rajinder Singh Badheri are in the fray.

http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2011/20110919/ punjab.htm# 4

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
5.

15-Yr Old Sikh-Canadian Tops 6000 Commonwealth Writers:

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Sun Sep 18, 2011 11:53 pm (PDT)

15-Yr Old Sikh-Canadian Tops 6000 Commonwealth Writers:
Simran Kaur Sandhu

by JEAN KONDA-WITTE

Her poignant essay contrasts two girls, one with a disdain for the
printed page, the other willing to risk her life to steal a book in
order to teach others to read.

The fictional work of Simran Kaur Sandhu has won the Abbotsford
(British Columbia, Canada) teen the special prize for imaginative
writing in the worldwide Royal Commonwealth Essay Competition.

Simran, 15, a Grade 10 student at Dasmesh Punjabi School, was the
lone Canadian winner, beating out stiff competition from more than
6,000 entrants from around the Commonwealth in this year’s
competition entitled Women as Agents of Change.

“I was kind of surprised. It was a great honour considering how many
entries there were,” said Simran.

“I was really proud. I couldn’t believe it. My teachers encouraged
me. Without them, I wouldn’t have even entered.”

Simran was rewarded with the special prize for her essay Running From
the Dust: Girl Power about a young female teacher bucking traditions
and the military in Afghanistan.

The judges were obviously impressed, saying: “This is an excellent
story which is well told. It is vivid, frightening and the writing
really flies in places. Simran offers a very thoughtful and engaging
comparison on how we value books in different circumstances and cultures.”

Simran said she researched the Taliban and Afghanistan before writing
her essay.

“I wanted to actually describe the cruelty. But there are still
people willing to stand up and change things for the better,” she
said of her fictional piece, which took just two days to write.

“Living in Canada, I’m completely blessed. I wanted to show two
people; a modern-day girl who doesn’t hold education and books above
technology,” she said. “And the other perspective where girls don’t
have a choice; a girl [in Afghanistan] who risks her life to steal a
book to teach others.”

Entrants were encouraged to think about the opportunities and
barriers faced by women around the world, as well as the role women
play in their families, communities and countries.

“The modern day girl still doesn’t realize what she has and what
other people are willing to give up to get it,” she said of her message.

The Essay Competition was founded in 1883, making it the world’s
oldest and largest school writing contest. It is part of the Royal
Commonwealth Society’s annual Young Commonwealth Competitions, which
also includes photography and film categories.

This year, the Royal Commonwealth Society is running two new
competitions, Me and My Net (www.meandmy. net), encouraging young
people around the Commonwealth to think about malaria prevention, and
the Jubilee Time Capsule (www.jubileetimecap sule.org) . The Capsule,
designed to mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012, will bring
together a collection of people’s stories and memories covering every
day of the last 60 years. There will be prizes awarded to the best
entries and prizes for schools involved in the project, known as
‘Super Schools.’

Following her success, Simran’s school – Dasmesh Punjabi School – has
been invited to become a Super School.

http://www.sikhchic .com/article- detail.php? cat=8&id= 2752

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
6.

The Spirit of Hola Mohalla: A Photo Exhibition

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Sun Sep 18, 2011 11:54 pm (PDT)

The Spirit of Hola Mohalla:
A Photo Exhibition

by SHEVETA BHATIA

For more than 13 years, Ambala-based mechanical engineer and
entrepreneur, Maninder Singh Sodhi, has never missed Hola Mohalla, a
festival that’s also known as the Sikh Olympics. Maninder has seen
and documented every session of the festivities – up, close and personal.

The result: a collection of over 1,000 photographs. Forty of those
have found find their way to a photography exhibition titled “The
Spirit of Hola Mohalla”.

While one photograph evokes the enthusiasm and fervour with which the
festival is celebrated at Takht Sri Keshgarh Sahib in Anandpur Sahib,
with people indulging in martial arts, another captures their
daredevil approach, with a man standing on a running motorbike.

“I have tried to summarise the event and bring out its best in this
photo essay exhibition,” says the 48-year-old, standing near the
photograph after which the exhibition has been named – it’s a
snapshot of nihangs as they climb on to a tree to get a glimpse of
the festival.

Amongst other works are those of simulated mock battles, gatka moves
and fun events. While a photo titled ‘Weapons of War’ showcases the
historical weapons used by the Sikhs, ‘American Dream’ zooms in on a
man with a scarf with an American flag on it. As for ‘Colours of
Joy’, the picture captures people playing with holi colours.

Also finding place in the exhibition are snapshots of the langar
(community kitchen), of men indulging in sword wielding, jousting and
other sports.

Maninder has earlier showcased these photographs in Washington, D.C.,
U.S.A. and also in Toronto, Canada. His short film by the same title
was selected and screened at the “The Spinning Wheel Film Festival”
in Toronto.

MANINDER SINGH SODHI – BIO

Maninder Singh, a mechanical engineering graduate from R.E.C
Kurukshetra did his early schooling from Convent of Jesus and Mary,
Ambala Cantt., and high school from Punjab Public School, Nabha, Punjab.

A keen photographer, he credits his photographic skills to his father
Sardar B.S.Sodhi, a President of India awardee in ‘Excellence in
Photography’ . Ever since he was a child, the emergence of black and
white images out of nowhere in his father’s darkroom with a single
red bulb dangling – it was magic unveiled !

Maninder has been an avid traveler round the world. He has lived and
worked in North America as well as Japan. He believes in the adage
that ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’. It should be able to tell
a story howsoever miniscule – and it must generate a little bit of
curiosity in the viewer’s mind. It can be about its composition,
colour, the human touch, the foreground or the backdrop – it must
appeal to the eye.

Having been associated with the festival of Hola Mohalla for the last
13 years, he has a sense of satisfaction in documenting the sequence
of events at this festival in simple but meaningful images. He
believes it is his passion which has led to this exhibition.

The exhibition is on at the Alliance Francaise Art Gallery, Sector
36, Chandigarh, Punjab, till September 26.

[Courtesy: Indian Express]

September 18, 2011
http://www.sikhchic .com/article- detail.php? cat=1&id= 2751

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
7.

When Will The Phoenix Rise?

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Sun Sep 18, 2011 11:54 pm (PDT)

When Will The Phoenix Rise?

by RAVNEET KAUR SANGHA

The building is broken down, paint peeling off. There are more plants
growing on the parapets and the nooks of the walls than in the so
called main garden. The path-way to the building no longer exists;
all there is is sand, more sand than the beaches of Bondi.

The rooms are cubby-holes smeared with a paint which is of a bygone
era, bleached of life, windows with iron bars as if blocking away any
ray of light or sunshine which might dare to creep in and spread some
warmth. The floor doesn’t exist. Uneven, it’s strewn with excuses of
desks and chairs. The black-board has no slate on it. The walls have
faded painted alphabets, both in English and Punjabi, but the lines
have disappeared as if the struggle to survive was too much .

The entire compound has a dead, neglected feel.

This is a senior secondary school run by the government in a
prominent village in Doaba, Punjab.

A rich state is in ruins now, fallen.

It is holding its S.G.P.C. elections today.

The polling booth was made for this electorate, each side fighting
for the panth, claiming to hold the keys to heaven and salvation.

The ideology is long lost. The only qualification considered
important and mandatory in this new environment is an open, flowing
beard. Yes, of course, I understand and appreciate and honour that
one must follow the discipline of the faith and honour the Punj
Kakkaars. But wherefore the additional rigidity, the rigor mortis,
that has set in within a faith of love and compassion.

Why have we become prisoners in the hands of a handful of corrupt
politicians who have shrouded themselves in an air of religiousity?
When convenient, they always fall back on religious extremism. I
worry that excess always positions itself for a fall, eventually. It
digs its own grave.

The scene at the voting booth is both hilarious and sad at the same
time (the pun is intentional) . Everyone is claiming his vote is for
the panth: a triangular contest is on the cards. One is “the true
son of the Guru-ghar”, the second is for “the real Akali Dal”, and
the third hails “the hard-core Akali Dal ( Amritsar)”.

All of them are clad in white kurta-pajamas, impressive with their
blue turbans and flowing beards.

I wonder which oil works for the long, right-colored salt-and -pepper
beards? And pray, how do all of them get them perfectly pointed at
the ends? Even Dumbeldore would be jealous of these beards, our
primary export to Holly wood … apart from Ms. Mallika and her ample bosom.

The battle is to be won on the platform of divinity, which of course
is closely guarded by the S.G.P.C., the same lot who will not allow
women to do kirtan in the Darbar Sahib. Nor is a Hindu or a Muslim
allowed to do seva – no truck is to be given to the memory of Bala
and Mardana.

Who appointed us the moral guardians of this faith which is the most
modern in the world – a religion which is the only one in the world
which treats all as equals. A tolerant faith. The keeper of the
community kitchen where no one is big, small, rich or poor, high or low.

But we have been overrun by buyers and sellers who trade our souls for votes.

I see the common man, woman voting … just because it is “for the
guru-ghar”. It effectively seals each question, every doubt ever
raised by any one. No one dare raise a voice of dissent because doing
so means questioning the Supreme One. No one ever wants to be caught
in that cross-fire.

The hour is nigh.

It is time for generation … and a new generation. A revolution. A
resurrection.

It is time for the phoenix to rise …

September 18, 2011

http://www.sikhchic .com/article- detail.php? cat=26

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)

Recent Activity
Visit Your Group
Need traffic?
Drive customers
With search ads
on Yahoo!

Y! Groups blog
The place to go
to stay informed
on Groups news!

Yahoo! Finance
It’s Now Personal
Guides, news,
advice & more.

Need to Reply?
Click one of the “Reply” links to respond to a specific message in the Daily Digest.

Create New Topic | Visit Your Group on the Web
Messages
Copyright (c) 2001-2006 Sikh-Diaspora @Yahoo! Groups. All rights reserved.
SD strives to provide an exceptional platform to achieve thought provoking debates; let your likeminded friends know about Sikh-Diaspora.
To subscribe : Sikh-Diaspora-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

MARKETPLACE
Stay on top of your group activity without leaving the page you’re on – Get the Yahoo! Toolbar now.

Saving piglets, saving families

Standard

— On Sat, 9/24/11, Todd Bernhardt, Director of Marketing & Communications <c+gfusa@trusted-sender.convio.net> wrote:

From: Todd Bernhardt, Director of Marketing & Communications <c+gfusa@trusted-sender.convio.net>
Subject: Saving piglets, saving families
To: preetlarhi@yahoo.com
Date: Saturday, September 24, 2011, 2:30 PM

Grameen Foundation
Dear poonam,

BigPig-small.jpg
Solimo squats proudly by the sow who had lost almost all of her first litter of piglets, but – with the help of Tabitha, Solimo’s Community Knowledge Worker (CKW) – had a healthy litter of piglets that he was able to sell to support his family. For a limited time, you can double your impact on our CKW initiative and others like it that use the mobile phone in innovative ways to help the poor help themselves.
Double your impact through our matching challenge today!

Donate to Grameen Foundation

For rural farmers around the world, access to information can literally be the difference between life and death. For a limited time, you have a unique opportunity to double your impact when you join us in helping individuals like Solimo in Uganda get access to the life-saving information they need.

Last September, Solimo’s pig gave birth to 15 piglets. A few days later, all but two of the piglets died, wiping out what would have been a major part of the family’s income.

Solimo contacted his neighbor Tabitha, who researched the pig’s illness using a special smartphone she received through Grameen Foundation’s Community Knowledge Worker (CKW) initiative. Tabitha and Solimo discovered that his pigs were suffering from anemia – an iron deficiency fatal to piglets, which can be solved by feeding the mother pig iron supplements and dry soil where iron is naturally found.

Earlier this summer, Solimo’s pig gave birth again, this time to 12 healthy piglets. He sold 10 for a healthy profit, while the remaining two piglets have grown and are pregnant themselves! With the information gained from his Community Knowledge Worker, Solimo is assured to have healthy pigs and a growing business for years to come.

Today, I’m inviting you to help us empower individuals like Solimo by donating to our new Technology Innovation Fund. This Fund will help Grameen Foundation fuel programs like our Community Knowledge Worker initiative and fight the problems caused by “information poverty,” where lack of fast, reliable information can threaten a family’s income, health … and even their lives.

And now is the perfect time to donate! Thanks to the generosity of our Board member Susan McCaw and her husband Craig, for a limited time your donation will be matched dollar-for-dollar up to $500,000.* This means you can double your impact as we work together to fight poverty.

Please make a gift today to our Technology Innovation Fund and join Grameen Foundation in its battle against poverty around the world.

With warmest thanks for your support,

Todd Bernhardt
Director of Marketing & Communications

P.S. In addition to helping farmers like Solimo, our innovative technologies are helping mothers in Ghana get better prenatal care, tracking microsavings initiatives across India, and making it easier for borrowers to repay loans via their mobile phones in Kenya. Our technology is making a difference in the lives of hardworking individuals around the world. Won’t you please join us in this important work?

*In compliance with Better Business Bureau requirements, all funds raised above and beyond the matching gift amount will be applied to the Technology Innovation Fund as designated by the donor.

View Grameen Foundation’s privacy policy and notice to contributors.


PixelServer?j=g0oh1qLMOxOnAHLGd64DQw

Grameen Foundation
1101 15th Street, NW
3rd Floor
Washington, DC 20005

unsubscribe | forward to a friend

www.grameenfoundation.org

Powered By Convio

Sikh-Diaspora Digest:some interesting posts

Standard

— On Wed, 9/14/11, Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com <Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

From: Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com <Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Sikh-Diaspora] Digest Number 5029
To: Sikh-Diaspora@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, September 14, 2011, 10:38 P

Sikh-Diaspora

Messages In This Digest (15 Messages)

1. Fire targeted Sikh-owned shop in Clay County From: J.S.Tiwana 2. Sikh students locked out of Vancouver school From: J.S.Tiwana 3. Global Potential of Our Community From: J.S.Tiwana 4. Back From Afghanistan, Sikh-Canadian Takes Command of Canadian Regim From: J.S.Tiwana 5. Capt Amarinder asks Makkar to explain Rs 1.62 cr fuel expense in a y From: J.S.Tiwana 6. Centre to reassess its stand on Anand Marriage Act issue From: J.S.Tiwana 7. Lady beats gender bias, wins property battle From: J.S.Tiwana 8a. All information on Indian Elections From: J.S.Tiwana 9a. Re: Sehajdhari is in the 1925 Act From: devinder1932 9b. Re: Sehajdhari is in the 1925 Act From: cjs sidhu 10a. Translators of AGGS From: virinder g 10b. Re: Translators of AGGS From: asingh 11. Turban-wearing peer vows to fight prejudice From: J.S.Tiwana 12. Hockey hero’s mother needs loan to cook biryani for her son From: J.S.Tiwana 13. Hockey players refuse to take Rs. 25,000 cash prize From: J.S.Tiwana
View All Topics | Create New Topic

Messages

1.

Fire targeted Sikh-owned shop in Clay County

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:06 pm (PDT)

Fire targeted Sikh-owned shop in Clay County

9:45 PM, Sep. 12, 2011

HAYESVILLE н Authorities are investigating a
possible hate crime at a small grocery store in
rural Clay County near the Georgia line.

Someone set fire to State Line Grocery on N.C. 69
and spray-painted У911 Go HomeФ on the outside of the shop.

The owners are Sikh, according to the Southern
Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate crimes
nationally. The owners could not be be reached Monday.

SheriffТs Deputy Todd Wingate said the
investigation is Уstill in the early stages.Ф An
accelerant was used to start the fire, he said.

The State Bureau of Investigation assisted with
the arson part of the case, said agency spokeswoman Noelle Talley.

It is not handling the suspected hate crime aspect, she said.

An FBI official in Charlotte would not say
whether a federal investigation is under way.

A sheriffТs deputy was the first on the scene of
the early Wednesday morning fire and used an
extinguisher and a garden hose on the blaze until the fire department arrived.

Sandeep Amy Kaur, staff attorney at the New
York-based Sikh Coalition, said the group is
monitoring law enforcement response to the crime
and has been in touch with the FBI.

Attacks against Sikhs are on the rise, according to the law center.

Sikhs are often viewed with suspicion and as
potential terrorists because their religion
requires unshorn hair, beards and turbans, Kaur said.

УThat is what we have to combat,Ф she said.

Her group was created after the Sept. 11, 2001,
attacks to stop violence against Sikhs through education.

More than 25 million people worldwide follow the Sikh faith.

Sikhism was revealed to Guru Nanak more than 500
years ago in the Punjab region, which boarders Pakistan and India.

The faith, according to the coalitionТs website
Уpreaches a message of devotion, remembrance of
God at all times, truthful living, equality
between all human beings, social justice, while
emphatically denouncing superstitions and blind rituals.Ф

http://www.citizen- times.com/ article/20110913 /NEWS/309120057/ Fire-probed- hate-crime? odyssey=tab|topnews|text| Frontpage

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
2.

Sikh students locked out of Vancouver school

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:06 pm (PDT)

Sikh students locked out of Vancouver school

September 11, 2011 by ctv news Source:
<http://www.ctvbc. ctv.ca/servlet/ an/local/ CTVNews/20110906 /bc_sikh_ lockout_110906/ 20110906/ ?hub=BritishColu mbiaHome>www.ctvbc.ctv. ca

SchoolClosed (79K)

<http://www.ctvbc. ctv.ca/servlet/ an/local/ CTVNews/20110906 /bc_sikh_ lockout_110906/ 20110906/ ?hub=BritishColu mbiaHome>Watch
news video here

As most British Columbian students returned to school Tuesday,
children at one South Vancouver elementary school were faced with an
unexpected lockout.

Parents whose children were enrolled at Guru Nanak Elementary School,
a private Sikh school, were shocked to find a padlock on the front
gate when they dropped their children off this morning.

For five years, the school was run by the Khalsa Diwan Society but on
Monday night temple executive members suddenly voted to close the school down.

The shutdown affects 73 students.

Parent Sukh Gusal waited outside the facility with his daughter
Hargunh for three hours waiting for answers.

Gusal said Hargunh, who is entering Grade 4, had spent several days
preparing for school and was disappointed that she couldn’t get in.

“She was excited to meet her teacher. When we came we saw everything
was locked up. All the parents are frustrated,” he said.

Amar Singh Sandhu believes the decision to shut down the school has
to do with money.

News1 (50K)
“I think they want a bigger income source than they have now, which
is wrong, because the school shouldn’t be shut down,” Sandhu said.

“The original founders of the society really promoted education.”

Led by Principal Devinder Maan, many of the parents marched into the
temple to speak to the society president, Kashmir Dhaliwal.

Dhaliwal said the committee locked the building because the lease
expired in July.

He insisted that all of the parents were notified about the pending
closure in 2009, an assertion that was answered with shouts of “no,
no, no,” from protesting parents.

“They already have the notice that lease has expired,” Dhaliwal said,
adding that all the parents had been served with written notices.

A memo from the Khalsa Society dated Sept. 16, 2009, does outline the
July lease expiry, although it’s unclear if the notice was received by parents.

When asked where the locked-out students would go to school, society
Secretary Ranjit Hayere said he is not responsible for the parents or children.

“It is their problem. It is up to the parents and principal to tell
them where to go,” he said.

“And if I am their position I would have arranged for my kid to go somewhere.”

The school, which offers specialized Sikh studies alongside
traditional curriculum, was approved by the province to operate until
at least 2014.

The B.C. Education Ministry says Guru Nanak receives 50 per cent of
its funding from the government.

http://www.sikhnet. com/news/ sikh-students- locked-out- vancouver- school

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
3.

Global Potential of Our Community

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:10 pm (PDT)

September 12, 2011
by Dr. Narinder S. Kapany
http://www.sikhfoun dation.org/

Global Potential of Our Community

As the third part of our series on the Transnational Punjabis in the
21st century, we feature Dr. Kapany’s keynote presentation at the
University of Fraser Valley Conference entitled “Global Potential of
Our Community.”

The last time Dr. Kapany had given a speech at the University of
Fraser Valley, it was the fall of 1984, soon after the crisis created
by the government of India attacking the Golden Temple under the
direction of Indira Gandhi. There was a senior member of the Canadian
Parliament present at the conference who was so moved by this speech
and learning the plight of Sikhs in India therefore requested a copy
of the speech to be distributed to all of Parliamentarians in Canada.

History of Punjab and Sikhs

Almost three decades later, things have changed considerably. Setting
the stage, the address began with the rich history of Punjab and
Sikhs which goes back thousands of years with great wars, beautiful
arts, great cultural developments, phenomenal agriculture, charming
poetry, and new religious heritage for which Sikhs are known.

As many are aware, our ancestors fought the last war of Alexander the
Great. They also fought numerous other wars when raiders have come to
India and have stopped them. The earliest educational system came
from Punjab. The earliest religious systems of the world were born in
the Far East including the birth of our 10 Gurus who taught us the
oneness of God, equality of mankind and womankind, hard work, and
charity. Extremely important was mandated the respect for all other
religions, as opposed to most other religions that are interested in
converting you to their food of thought. In fact if you look at our
Guru Granth Sahib, you’ll find a large number of translations from
Hindu and Muslim saints.

To read the full story please click on the line below :

http://www.sikhfoun dation.org/ 2011/sikh- punjabi-language -studies/ global-potential -of-our-communit y-by-dr.- narinder- s.-kapany/

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
4.

Back From Afghanistan, Sikh-Canadian Takes Command of Canadian Regim

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:10 pm (PDT)

Back From Afghanistan, Sikh-Canadian Takes Command of Canadian Regiment

NEWS REPORTS

In a history making ceremony, a change of command in the British
Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own) took place on Sunday,
September 11, 2011, at the Beatty Street Armoury in Vancouver,
British Columbia, Canada.

Lt.-Col. Bruce Kadanoff relinquished command of the regiment to
Lt.-Col. Harjit Singh Sajjan, who has taken over as Commanding
Officer of the Regiment.

Lt.-Col. Harjit Singh joined the British Columbia Regiment as a
Trooper in 1989 and was commissioned in the Regiment in 1991. He was
promoted to Captain in 1995 and to Major in 2005. He has served in
Bosnia-Herzegovina as well as three deployments to Afghanistan.

Most recently, in November 2010, he was requested to serve in
Afghanistan as the Special Assistant to U.S. Army Major-General James
Terry, Commanding General of the 10th Mountain Division and
Commander of Regional Command South.

The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own) is a Primary
Reserve armoured reconnaissance (recce) regiment of the Canadian
Forces; the regiment is subordinate to 39 Canadian Brigade Group of
Land Force Western Area.

Established in 1883, it is the oldest military unit in Vancouver,
British Columbia, Canada.

It parades at the Beatty Street Drill Hall at the corner of Dunsmuir
and Beatty in Downtown Vancouver. The regiment has been variously
designated as garrison artillery, rifles, infantry, and armoured, but
has been reconnaissance since 1965.

It has received forty battle honours in its history, and has been a
formation of the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps since 1942.
To read the full story please click on the line below :

http://www.sikhchic .com/article- detail.php? cat=23&id= 2739

also read
http://fateh. sikhnet.com/ sikhnet/news. nsf/NewsArchive/ C9E656DF0B2B2DD9 8725723500730CB7

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
5.

Capt Amarinder asks Makkar to explain Rs 1.62 cr fuel expense in a y

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:10 pm (PDT)

Capt Amarinder asks Makkar to explain Rs 1.62 cr fuel expense in a year

Punjab Newsline Network

Tuesday, 13 September 2011

CHANDIGARH: Punjab Pradesh Congress Committee President Capt
Amarinder Singh today asserted that the Akalis will have to account
for each and every rupee of the SGPC funds they squandered away
without any accountability. He asserted, the SGPC president Avtar
Singh Makkar must explain where did he spend Rs 1.62 crore during
last year, he claims to have spent on transport during one year.

Capt Amarinder revealed that not only had SGPC shown the Darbar Sahib
at a loss of Rs 23 crores last year, for the next year also they have
projected a deficit of about Rs 15 crores. Moreover, he asserted,
Makkar cannot escape the accountability for the whopping Rs 1.62
crores on transport.

The PCC President asked as how was it that the SGPC had projected the
Rs 15 crore deficit for the Darbar Sahib for the next year. He
pointed out, SGPC’s income cannot be estimated in advance as it
depends on the number of pilgrims who pay obeisance there and offer
donations. “It simply means that the Badals who control the SGPC by
proxy adjust the accounts in advance to show the deficits”, he pointed out.

The PCC president said, it was shocking and unprecedented that the
SGPC president had spent Rs 1.62 crore on fuel for transport. He
pointed out, the SGPC president is entitled to a single car. “This
amount calculates to Rs 44,000 per day”, he pointed out, while
asking, “it is simply unbelievable and needs to be probed
thoroughly”. He said, the SGPC presidents are there to serve the
institution not to indulge in luxury.

Referring to the Deputy Chief Minister Sukhbir Singh Badal’s
statement that the Gurdwaras are not meant for profits or losses,
Capt Amarinder retorted, that does not mean these are allowed to be
looted and robbed by the people like Badals, controlling these.

http://www.punjabne wsline.com/ content/capt- amarinder- asks-makkar- explain-rs- 162-cr-fuel- expense-year/ 33236

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
6.

Centre to reassess its stand on Anand Marriage Act issue

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:11 pm (PDT)

Centre to reassess its stand on Anand Marriage Act issue
Aditi Tandon/TNS

New Delhi, September 13
Amid hectic lobbying by the political tribe of Punjab, which is
united in its demand for registration of Sikh marriages under the
existing Anand Marriage Act, 1909, the Centre is working to
reconsider its stand of entirely dropping the proposal.

Law Minister Salman Khursheed has called for a comprehensive report
on the history of the Anand Marriage issue, including all
representations ever made to the government on the matter and the
legislative proposals submitted in this respect.

“I am trying to understand why for so long the issue kept coming up
and dying down. I have asked my ministry to give me a comprehensive
note on the matter, its history, the representations, draft Bill for
the suggested amendment and related submissions. We will take it from
there,” Khursheed told The Tribune.

He had yesterday assured the visiting former Punjab Chief Minister
and Punjab Pradesh Congress Committee (PPCC) president Amarinder
Singh of positive movement in the matter. The PPCC in a press
statement today said Khursheed had assured the visiting state
Congress delegation that “necessary measures had been initiated and
the process would be completed very soon.”

The minister had earlier extended similar assurances to Akali and
Congress MPs who had met him over the issue, which has snowballed
into a political controversy since The Tribune reported a fortnight
ago that the Centre had decided to drop the amendment proposal.

So far as the issue goes, it is rooted in the problems which over 50
lakh Sikh NRIs and over two crore Sikhs face during migration abroad
and generally in respect of wedding registrations. While their
marriage certificates describe them as Hindus, they claim to
represent a sovereign Sikh religion. “The Anand Marriage Amendment
Act simply seeks to end this confusion by incorporation of a
provision that allows the registration of Sikhs marriages performed
as per Anand Karaj rites. Any religion that claims sovereignty must
have its own ceremonies of birth, marriage and death,” senior Supreme
Court advocate HS Phoolka explained.

At present, Sikhs, Buddhists and Jains register marriages under the
Hindu Marriage Act, 1955. Followers of these religions are even
governed by Hindu Personal Laws like the Hindu Minority and
Guardianship Act, 1956; the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956,
and the Hindu Succession Act.

Christians, Parsis and Muslims on the other hand have their separate
laws, namely Christian Marriage Act, 1872; Parsi Marriage and Divorce
Act, 1936; and the Mohammaden Marriages and Divorces Registration
Act, 1876. The latter allows optional registration of marriages.

The Sikhs for their part have always sought a separate law to
register marriages but their demand got bolstered in 2006 when the
apex court directed state governments to mandatorily register
marriages. It was then that MP Tarlochan Singh moved in the Rajya
Sabha a proposal to amend the Anand Marriage Act to allow for
registration of Sikh marriages.

The proposal was unanimously recommended by the Parliamentary
Committee on Law on December 4, 2007, after the then Law Secretary KN
Chaturvedi told the panel (The Tribune has minutes of the said
meeting) that the government had no problems with amending the Anand
Karaj Act nor had it received any objection from any other community
in this respect. Subsequently, two Law Ministers HR Bhardwaj and
Veerappa Moily assured Sikhs of a Bill to this effect.

After Khursheed’s reverse stand, the community again finds itself on
the edge and demands are resurfacing to amend Article 25 of the
Constitution which guarantees the Right to Religion.

http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2011/20110914/ main5.htm

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
7.

Lady beats gender bias, wins property battle

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:11 pm (PDT)

Lady beats gender bias, wins property battle
AMIT ROY
[]

Indarjit Singh outside Parliament in London on Tuesday. (AFP)

London, Sept. 13: The new Sikh peer, Indarjit
Singh, today gave his full moral backing to a
daughter who had challenged her fatherТs will
that left almost his entire г870,000 estate to
his three sons and cut out his three girls.

Now that a judge has ruled in favour of Balvinder
Kaur Ahluwalia, the property of her late father,
Ranjit Singh, a Sikh, will be shared equally between his six children.

Two of the daughters, including Balvinder, had
received г20,000 each in the will while the third was left nothing.

Lord Singh, considered the Уvoice of British
SikhsФ and himself the father of two daughters,
said the law (Indian custom and practice) Уis
absolutely discriminatoryФ and should be changed as soon as possible.

The 79-year-old peer, who has been promoting Sikh
values on BBC Radio 4Тs Thought for the Day for
28 years and is henceforth to be known as УThe
Lord Singh of WimbledonФ, expressed disapproval
of the attitude of BalvinderТs brothers: УTo
think this has happened to Sikhs –Ц women are supposed to be equal to men.Ф

Although British governments are willing to be
accommodating to Sharia law, they are not willing
to allow Sikhs and Hindus the same degree of
latitude, especially as their women are now more
willing to fight for their rights.

The dispute turns on whether, in Asian culture in
general and Sikh culture in particular, daughters
are supposed to be looked after at marriage
through dowries and other gifts but family
property, particularly land and houses, is
protected by being left only to sons.

Although this may well have been custom and
practice in India and Pakistan, it runs counter
to equal rights and sex discrimination
legislation in Britain. Increasingly, daughters
are willing to tolerate rifts with their brothers to fight for their rights.

Ranjit Singh, of Crawley, West Sussex, had died
in his 70s in March 2009, leaving almost his
entire estate to his three sons: Jarnail, Ajaib and Jugdeep.

The pensioner had come from a poor Punjabi
village but lived frugally on emigrating to the
UK, worked for British Bakeries and, in his will,
signed in 1999, left an estate valued at г872,890.

Balvinder, a 42-year-old shipping solicitor, and
another sister went to court and disputed the
willТs validity. They said that two individuals,
who were supposed to have witnessed the fatherТs
signature, were not present at the same time, as the law requires.

One of the brothers, Jarnail, who is also a
solicitor, argued that in line with Sikh
tradition, the eldest sons assume the main role
and daughters are treated as part of their
husbandТs family and provided for through large wedding dowries.

He got short shrift from Judge Mark Cawson QC,
who said there was Уthe strongest evidenceФ that
the legal formalities had not been complied with in this case.

Central to the judgeТs ruling was the evidence of
one of the witnesses to the will, the dead manТs
neighbour, Maurice Grantham. He admitted he and
the other witness were not present at the same time when the will was signed.

Judge Cawson said after the four-day hearing: УI
am conscious, and have kept fully in mind, that
the effect of this judgment is to frustrate Mr
SinghТs testamentary intentions, and the result
will be… an intestacy as there is no later will.Ф

On BalvinderТs decision to go to court, the judge
commented: УI gained the impression that the
present litigation is very much a mission on her
part to correct what she perceives to be
injustice and, sadly, there is plainly no love
lost between her and the brothers.Ф

The case has generated a heated debate in Britain.

One view, in support of the brothers, was: УHe
(the deceased) obviously wanted his money to stay
in his family; if the daughters had his money,
married and then divorced, some of this
gentlemanТs money would have gone to the womanТs
husband and so have left his family. I hope the
brothers challenge this awful decision and win their case.Ф

This invited an angry response: УSo, it seems you
think that if the brothers should happen to
divorce, none of the money will Сleave the
familyТ and be given to their wives? Also, we
donТt actually know the fatherТs wishes, because
there were not two (simultaneous) witnesses to
his signature, so there could have been skullduggery.Ф

http://www.telegrap hindia.com/ 1110914/jsp/ frontpage/ story_14505058. jsp

Jagpal S Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
8a.

All information on Indian Elections

Posted by: “J.S.Tiwana” tiwana@bellaliant.net

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:12 pm (PDT)

Thank u Professor Nirmal Singh ji for the kind words.
I added the link on my India site. This is mostly for the local
community of Halifax.
They mostly use the link when they have to reach the Air Port to
catch a plane or to receive a guest.

I hv another page for our Sikh Society http://maritimesikh society.com/ mss.html
The first page on it has mostly links for the Gurdwara Sangat, but if
you click on the ‘See Next Page’ and then click on the link Book
Reviews, you will also find a review f your very well researched
book. I hv collected on this page most of the reviews written by me.
I started this web site in April 1999 to commemorate the 300 the
anniv of the Khalsa on the suggestion of the then President Mr G S Toor.

I do not much advertise these sites as there are thousands better
sites on the Internet. My sitesy serve well for our local Hindu and
Sikh community. Most of the members of the Indian community here in
Halifax are on my mailing list. This is v much used by the community.
Whenever there is a community function or religious celebration or a
death in the community, I m approached to send the news. I also send
a copy of the news item to the local community I share with our forum members.

Regards

Tiwana
Dartmouth, Canada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (3)
9a.

Re: Sehajdhari is in the 1925 Act

Posted by: “devinder1932” chahal.ius@gmail.com devinder1932

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:12 pm (PDT)

You believe that The Tribune cannot be wrong. So it be.

The fact is that Sehjdhari was Inserted by Punjab Act No. 1 of 1959 section 3 (4) in the Gurdwara Act 1925 after 34 years.

There is no question of acceptance of omission.

Rather you should realize that Sehjdhari is no word for a SIKH since SIKH means the one who is always learner of SIKHI.

I know the majority is on the side of Sehjdhari, you being the great protagonist, and it is easier to be a Sehjdhari than to be AMRITDHARI SIKH according to the definitions of Sehjdhari and Amritdharis given in the amendment of the act in 1959 and 1944, respectively.

If so then WHY WOULD ONE BECOME AMRITDHARI SIKH WHEN SEHKDHARI HAS ALL THE RIGHTS?

I request all the SIKHS to think over this situation seriously and define who is a SIKH.

Regards,
Devinder Singh Chahal
Canada

— In Sikh-Diaspora@ yahoogroups. com, “J.S.Tiwana” <tiwana@…> wrote:
>
> Dear Dr. Chahal ji
> Please do not complicate it. The discussion is about
> Sehajdharis, The whole issue in the media is about Sehahdharis’
> right to vote. You challenged the Tribune report that it was not
> there in the 1925 Act. I said no it is there in the act and Khush Ram
> a Sehajdhari was elected from Multan. I also cited a clause from the
> 1925 Act. You should gracefully accept ur omission.

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (5)
9b.

Re: Sehajdhari is in the 1925 Act

Posted by: “cjs sidhu” csidhu1uk@yahoo.co.uk csidhu1uk

Wed Sep 14, 2011 8:39 am (PDT)

Dear All,
Sat Sri Akal.
Do weа realise how the passage of time fashioned the meaning ofа “Sehajdhari” .

This sort of division has been with us for too long,а over hundred years.а

In 1909 for e.g. Max A Macauliffeа in The Sikh Religion Vol 1 wrote:-

“There are two great divisions of Sikhs, Sahijdharis and Singhs. The latter are those who accept the baptism inaugurated by Guru Gobind Singh,…

All other Sikhs are called Sahijdharis. The Singhs, after the time of Guru Gobind Singh, werse all warriors, the Sahijdharis those who lived ease, as the word denotes, and practised trade or agriculture. ( some say that the Sahijdharis received their name from the promises of certain Sikhs in the time of Guru Gobind Singh, that they would not accept his baptism at the time, but they would GRADUALLY do so).

In the Singhs are included the Nirmalals and Nihangs. The Sahijdharis include the Udasis founded by Sri Chand, son of Guru Nanak; the Ramraiyas,followers of Ram Rai, son of Guru Har Rai; the Handalis,… andа other sect of minor importance.”а ( Ch 2а of Introduction page 1ii)

Can youа see my point ? How out-datedа this term “Sahijdhari” has become. More importantly, what has it achieved?
Historically, we lost almost everything. Yet, we don’t let it go!а
It seems as soon as our numbers increase to more then a hand fullа division starts. Here in main cities of Australia, when Sikhs were few in numbers, there was unity,а recently as the numbers go up so do their divisions. From being Sikhs (of all types) now they are only with/without long hair, Malay/Singapore with/without turban, England wale’ and of course division by Punjabi district down toа village name .

If we must define – who is a Sikh?
Something along the lines….’As a follower of Sri Guru Grunth Sahib as his only guru,а a male Sikh calls himself aа ‘SINGH’ and female Sikh is a ‘KAUR’
should suffice.
If a confirmation is required, we all carry aа passport, ID card or driving licence.а

Regards.

Charanjit Singh
(UK, Currently in Australia)

____________ _________ _________ __
From: devinder1932 <chahal.ius@gmail. com>
To: Sikh-Diaspora@ yahoogroups. com
Sent: Tuesday, 13 September 2011, 22:14
Subject: [Sikh-Diaspora] Re: Sehajdhari is in the 1925 Act

а

You believe that The Tribune cannot be wrong. So it be.

The fact is that Sehjdhari was Inserted by Punjab Act No. 1 of 1959 section 3 (4) in the Gurdwara Act 1925 after 34 years.

There is no question of acceptance of omission.

Rather you should realize that Sehjdhari is no word for a SIKH since SIKH means the one who is always learner of SIKHI.

I know the majority is on the side of Sehjdhari, you being the great protagonist, and it is easier to be a Sehjdhari than to be AMRITDHARI SIKH according to the definitions of Sehjdhari and Amritdharis given in the amendment of the act in 1959 and 1944, respectively.

If so then WHY WOULD ONE BECOME AMRITDHARI SIKH WHEN SEHKDHARI HAS ALL THE RIGHTS?

I request all the SIKHS to think over this situation seriously and define who is a SIKH.

Regards,
Devinder Singh Chahal
Canada

— In Sikh-Diaspora@ yahoogroups. com, “J.S.Tiwana” <tiwana@…> wrote:
>
> Dear Dr. Chahal ji
> Please do not complicate it. The discussion is about
> Sehajdharis, The whole issue in the media is about Sehahdharis’
> right to vote. You challenged the Tribune report that it was not
> there in the 1925 Act. I said no it is there in the act and Khush Ram
> a Sehajdhari was elected from Multan. I also cited a clause from the
> 1925 Act. You should gracefully accept ur omission.

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Back to top
Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (5)
10a.

Translators of AGGS

Posted by: “virinder g” vsgrewal48895@yahoo.com vsgrewal48895

Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:12 pm (PDT)

Dear Members,

The following line from the hymn of Guru Amardas in Raag Bihagra Ki Vaar has been translated by at least 5 translations as a bottle of liquor and cup etc, while the meaning IMHO is that an individual is brought in to this world inundated by lower instincts (Maya) and stays like that unless he/she follows the teachings of the Guru.

риори╛ригри╕рйБ ринри░ри┐риЖ риЖригри┐риЖ риори╛ригри╕рйБ ринри░ри┐риЖ риЖриЗ рее
One person brings a full bottle, and another fills his cup.